Augustinian Anthology

Posted by Padre Eugenio Cavallari on 17 October 2016

 Translated by: Marco Biondi

ABBREVIATIONS OF ST. AUGUSTINE’S WORKS
1 - ad Hier. - Ad Hieronymum presbyterum (To Jerome) 2 - ad inq. Ian. - Ad inquisitiones Ianuarii (On the Inquiries of Januarius)
3 – adn. Iob - Adnotationes in Job (Comments on Job) 4 – adult. coniug. - De adulterinis coniugiis (On Adulterous Marriages)
5 - adv. Iud. - Adversus Iudaeos (Against the Jews) 6 - agon. - De agone christiano (On the Christian Struggle)
7 - an. et eius or. - De anima et eius origine (On the Soul and Its Origin) 8 – b. coniug. - De bono coniugali (On the Good of Marriage)
9 – b. vid. - De bono viduitatis (On the Good of Widowhood)  10 - bapt. - De baptismo contra donatistas (On Baptism against the Donatists)
11 – beata v. - De beata vita (On the Blessed Life) 12 – brevic. - Breviculus collationis cum donatistis (Summary of the Meeting with the Donatists)
13 - c. acad. - Contra academicos (Against the Academics) 14 - c. Adim. - Contra Adimantum (Against Adimantus)
15 – c. adv. leg. - Contra adversarium legis et prophetarum (Against an Adversary of the Law and the Prophets) 16 - c. Cresc. - Contra Cresconium grammaticum et donatistam (Against Cresconius the Grammarian)
17 - c. don. - Contra partem Donati post gesta (Against the party of Donatus after the Conference) 18 - c. ep. fund. - Contra epistulam quam vocant `fundamenti' (Against the Basic Letter of the Manichees)
19 - c. ep. Parm. - Contra epistulam Parmeniani (Against the Letter of Parmenian) 20 - c. ep. pel. - Contra duas epistulas pelagianorum (Against Two Letters of the Pelagians)
21 - c. Faust. - Contra Faustum manichaeum (Against Faustus the Manichee) 22 - c. Fel. - Acta contra Felicem manichaeum (Against Felix the Manichee)
23 - c. Fort. - Acta contra Fortunatum manichaeum (Debate with Fortunatus the Manichee) 24 - c. Gaud. - Contra Gaudentium donatistarum episcopum (Against Gaudentius a Donatist Bishop)
25 - c. Iul. - Contra Iulianum (Against Julian) 26 - c. Iul. imp. - Opus imperfectum contra Iulianum (Unfinished Work against Julian)
27 - c. litt. Pet. - Contra litteras Petiliani (Against the Letters of Petilianus) 28 - c. Max. - Contra Maximinum arianum (Against Maximinus)
29 - c. mend. - Contra mendacium ad Consentium (Against Lying) 30 - c. prisc. et orig. - Contra priscillianistas et origenistas (Against the Priscillianists and the  Origenists)
31 - c. s. arian. - Contra sermonem arianorum (Against an Arian Sermon) 32 - c. Sec. - Contra Secundinum manichaeum (Against Secundinus the Manichee)
33 – cat. rud. - De catechizandis rudibus (On Catechizing Beginners) 34 - civ. - De civitate dei (City of God)
35 - coll. Max. - Collatio cum Maximino arianorum episcopo (Discussion with Maximinus the Arian Bishop) 36 - conf. - Confessiones (Confessions)
37 - cons. ev. - De consensu evangelistarum (Consensus of the Evangelists) 38 - cont. - De continentia (On Continence)
39 - corr. Donat. - De correctione donatistarum (On the Correction of the Donatists) 40 - corrept. - De correptione et gratia (On Admonition and Grace)
41 - cura mort. - De cura pro mortuis gerenda (On the Care of the Dead) 42 - dial. - De dialectica (On Dialectic) 
43 - div. qu. - De diversis quaestionibus LXXXIII (Eighty-three Different Questions) 44 - div. qu. Simp. - De diversis quaestionibus ad Simplicianum (On Different Questions to Simplicianus)
45 - divin. daem. - De divinatione daemonum (On the Divination of Demons) 46 - doctr. chr. - De doctrina christiana (On Christian Teaching)
47 - duab. an. - De duabus animabus contra manichaeos (On the Two Souls against the Manichees) 48 - Dulc. qu. - De octo Dulcitii quaestionibus (On the Eight Questions from Dulcitius)
49 - Emer. - De gestis cum Emerito donatistarum episcopo (Proceedings with Emeritus) 50 – en. Ps. - Enarrationes in Psalmos (Expositions on the Psalms)
51 - ench. - Enchiridion ad Laurentium de fide et spe et caritate (Handbook on Faith, Hope and Love) 52 - ep. - Epistulae (Letters)
53 - ep. cath. - Epistula ad catholicos de secta donatistarum (Letter to the Catholics on the Sect of Donatists) 54 - ep. cath. - Epistula ad catholicos de secta donatistarum (Letter to the Catholics on the Sect of Donatists)
55 – exp. prop. Rom. - Expositio quarumdam propositionum ex epistola ad Romanos (Propositions from the Epistle to the Romans) 56 - f. et op. - De fide et operibus (On Faith and Works)
57 - f. et symb. - De fide et symbolo (On Faith and Creed) 58 – f. invis. - De fide rerum invisibilium (On Faith in Invisible Realities)
59 - Gal. exp. - Epistolae ad Galatas expositio (Explanation of the Letter to the Galatians) 60 - gest. Carth. - Gesta collationis Carthaginiensis (Proceedings of the Conference of Carthage)
61 - gest. Pel. - De gestis Pelagii (On the Proceedings concerning Pelagius) 62 - Gn. c. man.- De Genesi contra manichaeos (On Genesis against the Manichees)
63 - Gn. litt. - De Genesi ad litteram (On the Literal Interpretation of Genesis) 64 - Gn. litt. imp. - De Genesi ad litteram imperfectus liber (Unfinished Book on the Literal Interpretation of Genesis)
65 - gr. et lib. arb. - De gratia et libero arbitrio (On Grace and Free Choice) 66 – gr. et pecc. or. - De gratia Christi et de peccato originali (On the Grace of Christ and Original Sin)
67 - gr. N.T. - De gratia Testamenti Novi (On the Grace of the New Testament) 68 - gramm. - De grammatica (On Grammar)
69 - haer. - De haeresibus ad Quodvultdeum (On Heresies) 70 – imm. an. - De immortalitate animae (On the Immortality of the Soul)
71 – Io. ep. tr. -Tractatus in Ioannis epistulam ad Parthos (Tractates on the First Epistle of John) 72 – Io. ev. tr. - Tractatus in evangelium Ioannis (Tractates on the Gospel of John)
73 – lib. arb. - De libero arbitrio (On Free Choice of the Will) 74 – loc. hept. - Locutiones in Heptateuchum (Sayings on the Heptateuch)
75 - mag. - De magistro (The Teacher) 76 – mend. - De mendacio (On Lying)
77 – mor. - De moribus ecclesiae catholicae et de moribus manichaeorum (On the Catholic and the Manichaean Way of Life) 78 – mus. - De musica (On Music)
79 - nat. b. - De natura boni (On the Nature of the Good) 80 - nat. et gr. - De natura et gratia (On Nature and Grace)
81 - nupt. et conc. - De nuptiis et concupiscentia (On Marriage and Concupiscence)  82 – op. mon. - De opere monachorum (On the Work of Monks)
83 - ord. - De ordine (On Order) 84 - pat. - De patientia (On Patience)
85 – pecc. mer. - De peccatorum meritis et remissione et de baptismo parvulorum ad Marcellinum (On the Merits and Forgiveness of Sins and Infant Baptism) 86 – perf. iust. - De perfectione iustitiae hominis (On the Perfection of Righteousness)
87 - persev. - De dono perseverantiae (On the Gift of Perseverance) 88 - praed. sanct. - De praedestinatione sanctorum (On the Predestination of the Saints)
89 - ps. c. Don. - Psalmus contra partem Donati (Psalm against the Donatists) 90 - qu. ev. - Quaestiones evangeliorum (Questions on the Gospels)
91 - qu. exp. c. pag. - Quaestiones expositae contra paganos numero VI (Six Questions Against Pagans) 92 - qu. hept. - Quaestiones in Heptateuchum (Questions on the Heptateuch)
93 – qu. Mt. - Quaestiones XVII in Matthaeum (Seventeen Questions Concerning Matthew) 94 - qu. vet. t. - De octo quaestionibus ex Veteri Testamento (Eight Questions on the Old Testament)
95 - quant. an. - De quantitate animae (On the Magnitude of the Soul) 96 - retr. - Retractationes (Retractations)
97 - rhet. - De rhetorica (On Rhetoric) 98 – Rom. inch. exp. - Epistolae ad Romanos inchoata expositio (Incomplete Explanation of the Letter to the Romans)
99 - s. - Sermones (Sermons) 100 - s. Caes. eccl. - Sermo ad Caesariensis ecclesiae plebem (Sermon to the People of the Caesarean Church) 
101 - s. dom. m. - De sermone Domini in monte (On the Sermon of the Mount) 102 - s. suppl. - Sermones novi (Newly Discovered Sermons) 
 103 - sol. - Soliloquia (Soliloquies) 104 - spec. - Speculum de Scriptura sacra (A Mirror of Sacred Scripture) 
105 - spir. et litt. - De spiritu et littera (On the Spirit and the Letter) 106 - symb. cat. - Sermo de symbolo ad catechumenos (On the Creed to the Catechumens)
107 - trin. - De trinitate (The Trinity) 108 - un. bapt. - De unico baptismo contra Petilianum (Concerning the One Baptism against Petilian)
109 - util. cred. - De utilitate credendi (On the Usefulness of Believing) 110 - util. ieiun. - De utilitate ieiunii (On the Usefulness of Fasting)
111 - vera rel. - De vera religione (On True Religion) 112 - virg. - De sancta virginitate (On Holy Virginity)

I - MAN

1 - Man is a mortal rational animal (ord. 2, 11, 31)

2 -You look for man in man? You find the image and likeness of God (s. 229/V, 1)

3 - Refrain from injuring man, and acknowledge God in him! (en. Ps. 85, 19)

4 - Many people are satisfied with being just human beings (Io. ev. tr. 98, 3)

5 - The human nature was brought into union with the divine; God did not withdraw from Himself (ep. 137, 3, 10)

6 - Every man is every man’s neighbour (s. 299/D, 1)

7 - The human race is the most prone to discord by vice and the most sociable by nature (civ. 12, 27, 1)

8 - In every man there is the entire creation, not in its completeness -as are the sky, the earth and everything is in them- but in a generic way. In him there is the rational soul, which also the angels are believed to have, the animal soul, like in the beasts, and the vegetative soul, which is in plants. So there is no kind of creature that might not be recognized in man; because of this, he represents in his body the body of all creation (c. prisc. et orig. 8, 11)

9 - Man summarizes everything in himself. In him there is something invisible in the sphere of the soul, something visible in the sphere of the body. The entire creation is in part visible and in part invisible, but no other creature summarizes the whole in itself (c. Sec. 8)

10 - A weeping man is better than a rejoicing worm (vera rel. 41, 77)

11 - Don’t despise yourselves, men: the Son of God became man. Don’t despise yourselves, women: the Son of God was born of a woman (agon. 11, 12)

12 - God made the woman as a help, so that the man too might have glory from her by preceding her in going towards God and by offering himself as an example to her for imitation in holiness and godliness, in the same way as he is God’s glory whenever he follows His wisdom (cat. rud. 18, 29)

13 - The man must lead the woman without allowing her to dominate over the man, since, when it happens, a family is upset and unhappy (Gn. c. man 2, 11, 15)

14 - It is one thing to love a human being, another thing to set one’s hope in a human being (cat. rud. 25, 49)

15 - We departed from God by ceasing to be similar to Him, but He didn’t allow us to perish (vera rel. 55, 113)

16 - Man cannot object at all to God’s power (s. 269, 2)

17 - Yield to God, because He is God (s. 15/A, 8)

18 - God’s image subdues the beasts, and God shall not subdue His own image? (s. 55, 3, 3)

19 - Empty images are like painted foods (vera rel. 51, 100)

20 - God offers Himself to us in the form of a gain. He cries out: ‘Love Me and you shall possess Me, because, without possessing Me, you cannot even love Me’ (s. 34, 5)

21 - Love God so that God may love you, and you cannot show how much you love God, unless you show that you love His interests (s. 296, 13)

22 - Don’t ask anything of God, except God. Love gratuitously, desire from Him only Himself. Don’t be afraid of poverty: He gives Himself for us and He is enough for us. May He give Himself and this is enough (s. 331, 5, 4)

23 - God must be shown and must be shown to man. No man can show Him: He Himself shows Himself. I can only suggest to you what you may do to deserve to see Him (s. suppl. 23, 8)

24 - God’s face, my brothers and sisters, is so sweet, so beautiful, that, after seeing it, nothing else can delight us! (s. 170, 9)

25 - The whole of our prize will be to see God (s. suppl. 23, 1)

26 - You tell me: ‘Show me your God. I tell you: ‘Show me your soul’ (s. suppl. 23, 9)

27 - Let me know myself, let me know You [noverim me, noverim te] (sol. 2, 1, 1)

SPIRITUAL SOUL OR SPIRIT

1 - The soul has a greater weight than heaven and earth (s. 330, 3)

2 - The soul is called soul (anima) because it animates the body, that is, it vivifies it; it is also called spirit because it is spiritual (an. et eius or. 4, 23, 37)

3 - The human spirit is one reality with two functions: reason and intellect. Through the former it performs an action of rational nature on temporal things, through the latter it contemplates the eternal realities. In it is God’s image (trin. 12, 4, 4)

4 - Souls can live only by virtue of life (duab. an., 1, 1)

5 - In the soul I see two faculties: memory and intellect, which are the eye and the sight of the soul (Io. ev. tr. 23, 11)

6 - The soul is the beauty of the body, God is the beauty of the soul (Io. ev. tr. 32, 3)

7 - Every soul depends on truth; now truth is God, therefore the soul, in order to exist, must have God as its author (div. qu. 1)

8 - Sin is the only death of immortal soul (duab. an. 2, 2)

9 - Dismiss all these things, O soul, so that you may be worthy of God’s embrace: give yourself to Him in gratuitous love! (s. 385, 6)

10 - Let us lift up our soul to Him while pouring it out above us. Let us lift up our soul to God, not against God; and let us lift it up with His assistance, for it is heavy. And why is it heavy? Because the body, which is corrupt, weighs down the soul, and the earthly tabernacle depresses the mind while meditating on many things. Let us try, then, to withdraw our mind from the many things in order to concentrate it on one, and to raise it back to unity (Io. ev. tr. 23, 5)

11 - God has endowed the soul with a nature so powerful, that in eternal life its happiness will overflow also upon the body, which it will make incorruptible (ep. 118, 3, 14)

12 - The boundary between exterior man and interior man, that is, between soul and body, comes from the fact that to the body belongs all that is proper to animal life, while to the soul belongs all that is spiritual and higher: the attention on reality, the intentional memories, thoughts, judgments according to the eternal value. All this does not constitute a breach, but a help towards a subordinate sphere: material reality (trin. 12, 1.2.3)

13 - One thing is the function by which the soul vivifies the body, another thing is the principle by which the soul is vivified: its life is God. And as it imparts vigour and beauty to the body, in the same way God imparts wisdom, godliness, righteousness, love (Io. ev. tr. 19, 12)

14 - O rational soul, I beg you to accept being somewhat inferior to what God is, the more that, after Him, nothing is higher than you. Accept and be meek towards Him, so that He may not push you into an even lower place, where the good that is in you would lose value because of the distress of the punishment. If you resent that He comes before you, you are arrogant towards God; on the contrary, thank Him in an ineffable way realizing that you are such a great good that only He is greater than you (c. ep. fund. 37, 43)

MEMORY-MIND

1 - All the facts of history and God’s miracles themselves are beaten into the memory, like gravel, by frequent reading (civ. 22, 8, 22)

2 - Our infancy is deleted by the flood of oblivion (Gn. c. man. 1, 23, 35)

3 - As material bodies are the measure of perception, memory is the measure of thought (trin. 11, 8, 14)

4 - Memory is the capability to remember the past and the faculty that allows the spirit to be present to itself, so that it may understand with its thought and unite, through self-love, memory and intelligence (trin. 14, 11, 14)

5 - We usually call mind what is rational and intellectual in us (an. et eius or. 4, 22, 36)

6 - Nobody loves what he does not remember or of which he is wholly ignorant. Hence the well known and primary commandment: ‘You shall love the Lord your God’. The human mind is so constituted, that it never ceases to remember itself, to understand and to love itself. Whoever knows how to love himself, loves God; and if he does not love God, he does not even love himself. When someone loves another person, it is because he remembers and understands that person. The same applies to the love toward one’s neighbour: one loves the other people as himself or herself (trin. 14, 14, 18)

7 - The spirit is a faculty of the soul, where the images of corporeal things are impressed, whose interpretation, through intelligence, appears in the mind (Gn. litt. 12, 9, 20)

8 - Man, by means of his mind, collects, that is, understands himself in himself (c. acad. 1, 8, 23)

9 -The Biblical expression ‘spirit of the mind’ signifies the faculty by which a spiritual man judges everything (Gn. litt. 12, 24, 51)

INTELLIGENCE

1 - Ideas are primary forms or stable and unchangeable causes of reality. They have not been formed in the act of creation, they are eternal and always identical to themselves; they are contained in the divine intelligence (div. qu. 46, 2)

2 - Intelligible realities are the ones we see through the enlightenment of the mind (duab. an. 6, 7)

3 - Intelligence is, in a certain way, enlightened by intelligible light in order for us to judge objectively the whole sensible reality, which can be judged by us within the limits of our capabilities to grasp that light. It is the ‘inner sense’, which perceives outer objects and judges them. In this inner spiritual sense I have the certainty that I exist and that I am aware of that, I love these things and I am certain that I love them (civ. 11, 27, 2)

4 - Our mind, which is the eye of the soul, unless it is irradiated by the light of truth and is wonderfully illuminated by the one who enlightens without being enlightened, will not be able to come to wisdom nor to righteousness. How is it possible that he who walks without light does not stumble? (Io. ev. tr. 35, 3)

5 - Someone knows himself more than any other person, in the measure in which he can see, by inward inspection, what he thinks, what he desires, what shapes his own life. And when we start to know all this of him, then also that man becomes truly known to us (Io. ev. tr. 90, 1)

6 - By means of the mind I understand that the things said are true, by means of it I understand that I understand, and I understand that I can proceed ad infinitum. I finally understand that I could not understand if I didn’t live. Even, therefore, when I cannot understand what exceeds understanding, for example eternity, I perceive it through intelligence (vera rel. 49, 97)

7 - If I did not live, I could not understand [sum ergo cogito] (vera rel. 49, 97)

8 - We see the things You made because they are; but things are because You, God, see them (conf. 13, 38, 53 

9 - When you don’t know, don’t believe that you know; on the contrary, learn that you don’t know in order to know (an. et eius or. 4, 24, 38)

10 - Some thoughts are a kind of language of the heart, where there is a mouth as well -beside the mouth of the body- as the holy Scripture says (trin. 15, 10, 18)

11 - I desire to know God and the soul - Nothing else? - Nothing at all (sol. 1, 2, 7)

12 - One thing is God's knowledge, another man's. With whom there is the highest power, there is highest and most secret cognition. How He knows I dare not say. One thing, nevertheless, I know, that even before all the creatures were, God knew what He was to create. He knew what He had created, and before He created He knew. With Him they were in a certain ineffable manner before they were created. For with Him were all things to come, and with Him are all bygone things. With Him are all things by a certain cognition of the ineffable wisdom of God residing in the Word, and the Word Himself is all things. With Him is the whole. And why are all things with Him? Because even before that all things were, or were created, to Him all things were known (en. Ps. 49, 18)

13 - There are people who want to understand, but they cannot; there are also people who don’t want to understand, so they don’t understand (en. Ps. 35, 4)

14 - If we really know, we cannot but love: a knowledge without love does not save (Io. ep. tr. 2, 8)

15 - He that increases knowledge, increases sorrow  (en. Ps. 38, 20)

16 - It is in his or her thoughts that a person gets close or far from God. Every act, good or bad, has its origin in thought: everyone is innocent or guilty in his or her thought. When shall a man be able to be happy if, in his thought, he is miserable? How shall not a man be miserable in his thought, if he has been brought to nothing? In fact evil is a great misery, since it empties the soul and brings it to nothing (en. Ps. 118, sermon 24, 6)

17 - God’s intellect is also called ‘secret vision’, inasmuch as it sees in the most secret and inmost part of man. God sees inside the heart. He understands the purposes behind the actions, the intentions themselves (en. Ps. 32, II, sermon 2, 22)

18 - Whoever understands gets the truth. Whoever, on the contrary, thinks in a false way does not understand (s. 23, 5)

19 - To know is a great thing, to know is difficult (s. 48, 6)

20 - Whoever is mistaken does not understand the thing in which he is mistaken (div. qu. 32)

21 - One thing is to have taken no pains to know, another thing is to want to understand but without success and to act against the law without understanding what should have been done (nat. et gr. 17, 19)

22 - It is better a faithful ignorance than an inconsiderate knowledge (s. 27, 4)

23 - The curious man seeks after things that in no way pertain to him, but the studious man, on the contrary, seeks after what pertain to him, inasmuch as he desires to learn what is apt to nourish and adorn his own mind (util. cred. 9, 22)

WILL

1 - The will is a motion of the soul, without any constraint, either for not losing or for obtaining something. A soul may be at the same time unwilling and willing, but it cannot be at the same time unwilling and willing with reference to one and the same thing. Every one who willingly does a thing is not compelled, and whoever is not compelled, either does it willingly or not at all (duab. an. 10, 14)

2 - The will is, as it were, the first announcement of the life of the spirit, insofar as it precedes and follows intellectual life (trin. 11, 5, 9)

3 - The will has the function of uniting and separating realities such as these: sense, memory, thought (trin. 11, 10, 17)

4 - The will is in all inclinations, or, rather, the inclinations are nothing else than acts of the will. Desire and joy are, in fact, the will itself in agreement with the things we wish; fear and sadness are, on the contrary, the will in disagreement with the things we don’t wish (civ. 14, 6)

5 - Since there are two things -will and ability-, it follows that not every one that has the will has therefore the ability as well, nor has every one that possesses the ability the will also; for, as we sometimes will what we cannot do, so also we sometimes can do what we do not will. The man who wishes, therefore, has volition, the man who can has ability. But in order that a thing may be done by ability, the volition must be also present. We call that ability when to the volition is added the faculty of doing (spir. et litt. 31, 53)

6 - We don’t want to assert that our will does nothing, but we assert that it, alone, is not enough (s. suppl. 30, 13)

7 - Satisfaction is a will that rests content (trin. 11, 5, 9)

8 - God is the judge of the wills and the creator of the natures (c. Fel. 2, 12)

9 - The right will is good love and the wrong will is bad love (civ. 14, 7, 2)

10 - For it is more in accordance with propriety that we should follow God’s will than that He should follow ours (cat. rud. 14, 20)

11 - Give what You command and command what You will (conf. 10, 29, 40)

12 - There is no will except in relation to what is good: in the case of bad and wicked deeds we should rather speak of desire (s. dom. m. 2, 22, 74)

13 - Willing comes from the one who has the will (c. Iul. imp. 5, 42)

14 - Wherever there is any will, it cannot be separated from nature (c. Iul. imp. 5, 53)

15 - It is ours to will: but the will itself is admonished, so that it may arise; and healed, so that it may have power; and enlarged, so that it may receive; and filled, so that it may have (b. vid. 17, 21)

16 - Willing is within my power, but doing the good is not (s. 193, 2)

17 - Activity without knowledge is inconsiderate, knowledge without activity is sterile (div. qu. 58, 2)

FREEDOM

1 - If there is no freedom, there is no will (duab. an. 11, 15)

2 - May truth free us, so that we may truly be happy! (s. 241, 5)

3 - We are really free when we don’t experience enjoyment against our will (nupt. et conc. 1, 30, 33)

4 - By abusing his free will man loses himself and loses it (ench. 9, 30)

5 - Free will has been given to man when he was created, but at a condition: if he did evil, would have to undergo punishment (c. Gaud. 1, 19, 21)

6 - Free will is an ambivalent faculty: it can choose the good or the evil. It is by God’s vocation that the will springs from the free will received by man as a gift of nature at the moment of his creation. But God’s will remains always invincible (spir. et litt. 33, 58)

7 - The reason why in doing a right action there is no bondage of necessity, is that there is the freedom of charity (nat. et gr. 65, 78)

8 - It came by the freedom of choice that man sinned; but a penal corruption closely followed, and out of freedom produced necessity. True freedom is also real health; and this would never have been lost, if the will had remained good (perf. iust. 4, 9)

9 - Only he who observes the law willingly observes it freely. And whoever learns his duty in this way, does everything that he has learned ought to be done (gr. et pecc. or. 1, 13, 14)

10 - If is free only who can do both good and evil, God is not free… But it is a blessed necessity the one that prevents God from sinning (c. Iul. imp. 1, 103)

11 - God neither can want nor wants to be able to sin (c. Iul. imp. 1, 103)

12 - Free will is a gift of God and not of nothingness, and in God Himself free will is at the highest level, inasmuch as He cannot sin at all. If, in fact, God could be unjust, it would mean that God might not be God -which is totally absurd (c. Iul. imp. 5, 38)

13 - Free will was given by the Creator, but it was corrupted by the deceiver, and therefore needs to be healed by the Saviour  (c. Iul. imp. 3, 110)

14 - Liberation does not mean only forgiveness of sin, but strength given to prevent concupiscence from prevailing over the will (c. Iul. imp. 1, 108)

15 - The first freedom of the will was to be able not to sin; the last shall be much greater: not to be able to sin. The first immortality was to be able not to die, the last shall be much greater: not to be able to die; the first was the power of perseverance, to be able not to forsake good, the last shall be the felicity of perseverance, not to be able to forsake good (corrept. 12, 33)

16 - The will is free to accomplish good deeds because it has been set free by God’s gift (b. vid. 18, 22)

17 - The whole work belongs to God, who makes the will of man righteous, and both prepares it for assistance and assists it when it is prepared. In fact, man's righteousness of will precedes many of God's gifts, but not all; and it must itself be included among those which it does not precede (ench. 9, 32)

18 - As God differs from man, so God’s will differs from man’s will (en. Ps. 32, II, sermon 1, 2)

19 - The good will is a will faithfully subjected to God, a will set on fire by the holiness of that ardour which is above, a will which loves God and one’s neighbour for God's sake (pat. 25, 22)

20 - When man falls away from God, the unchanging Good, he makes himself bad (gr. et pecc. or. 1, 19, 20)

21 - This is the great and common perversity of men, that while they should live according to God’s will, they want God to live according to their will (en. Ps. 48, sermon 1, 1)

22 - If evil and death please man, his will effects all this; but if, on the contrary, he loves goodness and life, his will does not accomplish the choice alone, but is assisted by God. The eye indeed is sufficient for itself, for not seeing, that is, for darkness; but for seeing it is in its own light not sufficient for itself unless the assistance of a clear external light is offered to it (gest. Pel. 3, 7)

23 - He who falls, falls by his own will, and he who stands, stands by God’s will (persev. 8, 19)

24 - The feet, the steps, the wings inside the heart are the affections of the good will (en. Ps. 38, 2)

25 - Liberal arts have nothing which is consonant with liberty, except by what in them is consonant with truth (ep. 101, 2)

26 - If we really want to defend the free will, let us not oppose the source of its freedom. Whoever fights against grace, by which our freedom to reject evil and to do good is sustained, wants to make the free will captive (ep. 217, 3, 8)

27 - The law exposes transgressors, grace frees from guilt; the law threatens, grace entices; the law tends to punish, grace assures forgiveness (s. suppl. 31, 3)

28 - Let us distinguish four stages of mankind: before the law, under the law, under grace, in peace. Before the law people follow the concupiscence of the flesh, under the law people oppose it and are defeated, under grace people oppose and defeat it, in peace there is no concupiscence of the flesh  (exp. prop. Rom. 12)

29 - The law prescribes our duty and faith accomplishes it (nat. et gr. 16, 17)

CONSCIENCE

1 - Let the mind not seek to discern itself as though absent, but take pains to discern itself as present. Nor let it take knowledge of itself as if it did not know itself, but let it distinguish itself from what it knows to be other. It knows itself by being present to itself (trin. 10, 9, 12)

2 - There is a forehead in the face and there is a forehead in the conscience, in the interior man, where the mark of your dignity and personality is (s. 107, 6, 7)

3 - Conscience is the glory of the soul, insofar as it approves the actions of man, by which each one finds in himself and not in another the reason for pride (adn. Iob 39)

4 - The conscience of the heart is the womb of interior man (Io. ev. tr. 32, 4)

5 - Conscience: great wilderness that no man treads nor sees. An interior desert exists: let us ask ourselves if there is love there. There are the streams of memory, which contain divine waters that sprang from the meditation on God’s Word. Make all this rest there, in that interior wilderness that is a good conscience (s. 47, 23)

6  - Wherever there is no science, there is also no conscience (c. Iul. 5, 1, 3)

7 - What is incongruous with action is incongruous with conscience; what is incongruous with conscience seems to be incongruous also with science (en. Ps. 34, sermon 2, 2)

8 - We must not to be conformed to the world, but be transformed in the renewal of our minds, so that we may prove what is God’s will, what is good and acceptable and perfect (civ. 10, 6)

9 - May nothing of you be against you, and you will remain unhurt (s. 128, 6, 9)

10 - Each one is prejudicial only to his or her own cause, not to another’s (c. don. 7, 9)

11 - To the good consciences God is present as a father, to the bad consciences as a judge (s. 12, 3)

12 - Even if to itself a conscience is conscious of godliness, it would be strange if it were not, in some respect, also conscious of iniquity (en. Ps. 58, sermon 1, 12)

13 - False witnesses can cause disrepute, but they cannot kill a conscience (s. 343, 2)

14 - If I, with a right conscience, act for justice, whoever voluntarily brings discredit upon me, involuntarily increases my reward (c. litt. Pet. 3, 7, 8)

15 - The praise of men should not be sought by those who act rightly, but should rather be a consequence of their right actions (s. dom. m. 2, 2, 5)

16 - Neither the commendation of those who praise heals a bad conscience, nor the reproach of those who revile wounds a good conscience (c. litt. Pet. 3, 7, 8)

17 - Each one must stand before himself or herself as a judge: reflection be there as an accuser, conscience as a witness, fear as a punisher. And in the tears may the blood flow of the souls who confess themselves sinners  (s. 351, 4, 7)

18 - Make progress, my brethren, examine yourselves without any deceit, any adulation, any flattery. Someone dwells inside you, before whom you cannot either blush with shame or boast. God likes humility: is He the one who tests and approves you (s. 169, 15, 18)

HEART

1 - When we hear that we should love God with our whole heart, this is not said of that portion of our flesh which lies under our ribs, but of that power that originates our thoughts. And this is properly designated by this name, because, as motion does not cease in the heart whence the pulsation of the veins radiates in every direction, so in the process of thought we do not rest in the act itself but we go on and on pondering (an. et eius or. 4, 6, 7)

2 - Many people don’t have their heart in their heart -they cannot see inside-, but in their eyes -they see only what appears outside- (c. ep. Parm. 1, 8, 14)

3 - Change your heart and your behaviour will change too. Remove greediness from your heart, plant charity there (s. suppl. 16, 8 

4 - The soul becomes restless and miserable in its vain desire to possess the realities by which it is possessed. It is therefore invited to rest, that is, not to love things that cannot be loved without distress. Only this way it will not be possessed, but will possess them (vera rel. 35, 65 

5 - It is a great suffering not to have the object of one’s love. It is a torment of the heart to love something and not to possess it (s. 65/A, 2)

6 - The expansion of the heart is the feeling of delight that comes from justice (en. Ps. 118, sermon 10, 6)

7 - You have made us for Yourself, and our hearts are restless until they rest in You (conf. 1, 1, 1)

8 - If your heart is attached to a man, your hope rests on man: you are dust hoping in dust (en. Ps. 93, 7)

9 - Return to yourself and, once you have returned to yourself, turn again upwards, don’t remain in yourself. First return to yourself from the outer reality, and then return yourself to the one who made you and searched for you after you got lost, who found you while you were fleeing away and converted you to Himself. Return therefore to yourself and go to the one who made you (s. 330, 3)

10 - Nothing cleanses the heart but the undivided and single-minded striving after eternal life from the pure love of wisdom alone (s. dom. m. 2, 3, 11)

11 - A heart is righteous when it wants everything God wants (en. Ps. 100, 6)

12 - The temple of your prayer is your heart. God dwells in the heart of a faithful man (s. suppl. 26, 11)

13 - God cannot be pointed to with a finger, but must be perceived with the heart (s. 261, 3)

14 - The heart of a person who prays is more important than the place of prayer (ep. cath. 19, 49)

15 - Have the provident and thrifty heart of an ant (s. 38, 6)

16 - It is a great conquest to have a firm heart, who unswervingly hopes to reach the eternal goods in God (en. Ps. 11, 7)

17 - Those who love the world become, by their affection, its dwellers; those, on the contrary, who lift their hearts upwards, become dwellers of heaven, even if they still physically walk on earth (Io. ep. tr. 2, 12)

18 - Lift up what you love, and love it up there (s. 114/A, 3)

19 - To keep one’s heart on high means to love God with all one’s heart, soul and mind (s. 399, 5, 5)

20 - If you have your heart on high, you are woven from above; if you are woven from above, you cannot be divided (s. suppl. 21, 18)

21 - Rise from little things to the knowledge of great things (s. suppl. 22, 6)

22 - Our ascent is in the heart, towards God from whom we differ. But it is our likeness to Him that ascends to Him, which He made and re-made in us and because of which our weak sight, not yet perfect, trembles and cannot see the ineffable brightness of the eternal light (s. 369, 2)

23 - Only godliness and purity lead the mind to the highest realities (mor. 2, 7, 10)

24 - Those who want to have their hearts on high should put up there what they love; even  while living in the body on earth, may their hearts live together with Christ; as the Church was preceded by her head, in the same way Christians should be  preceded by their own hearts. Christians, through their resurrection, are intended to return there where their hearts will have preceded them. Let us move first there, where we want to go (s. 86, 1, 1) 

BODY

1 - It cannot be said that there is anything among temporal goods greater or dearer than the health and life of the body (mend. 6, 9)

2 - While we say that our body is an animal body, because it is subject to the soul (anima), it cannot be called yet spiritual, because is not completely subject to the spirit, as long as it can undergo corruption. It will be called spiritual when it is able to sustain spirit and eternity without any corruption  (c. Adim. 12, 4)

3 - The soul is moved by the will, the body moves in space (vera rel. 14, 28)

4 - Without the soul, the flesh of man cannot see anything (Io. ev. tr. 47, 9)

5 - There is no purity of body except as it depends on integrity of soul (mend. 7, 10)

6 - It is very easy to curse the flesh, but it’s very difficult not to think according to the flesh (vera rel. 20, 40)

7 - Every body is a true body, but a false unity. It is not the supreme One, and cannot imitate it so much as to reach it, but, if it were not one at all, it would not even be a body (vera rel. 34, 63)

8 - Perfect health of body shall be that ultimate immortality of the whole man (ep. 118, 3, 14)

9 - Cramped is the dwelling of my soul; expand it, that You may enter in. It is in ruins, restore it. There is something about it which must offend Your eyes; I confess and know it, but who will cleanse it? Or to whom shall I cry but to You? (conf. 1, 5, 6)

SENSES

1 - There are two kinds of vision, the one consisting in perceiving by the senses, the other consisting in reflecting (trin. 11, 9, 16)

2 - The face is a body, but the image is an incorporeal likeness of the body (ep. 147, 16, 38)

3 - The eyes cannot stare at the sun, but willingly stare at the things lit by the sun (vera rel. 20, 39)

4 - Sometimes the eyes see what they should better ignore (nupt. et conc. 1, 6, 7)

5 - The soul opposes the impurity of the flesh when the senses of the flesh are offended, and loves its own impurity when the senses of the heart are no longer active (c. adv. leg. 1, 24, 50)

6 - There is one function in the soul, by which we perceive real bodies, which we do by the five bodily senses; another, which enables us to discern, apart from these, non-corporeal likenesses of bodies -and by this we can have a view of ourselves also-; and a third, by which we gain a still surer and stronger insight into objects fitted for its faculty, which are neither corporeal nor are like bodily substances -that is, the spiritual world- (an. et eius or. 4, 20, 31)

7 - Let us also lift up our hands to God in prayer: and our hands being lifted up to God shall not be confounded, if they are exercised in good works (en. Ps. 62, 13)

II - GOD

His nature

1 - God is ineffable: we can more easily say what He is not than what He is (en. Ps. 85, 12)

2 - If you cannot understand what God is, at least understand what He is not. You are already on the right track if you don’t think something wrong about God (Io. ev. tr. 23, 9)

3 - You cannot know what God is, unless you have already learned what He is not (s. suppl. 25, 10)

4 - An indistinguishable thing has been shown in a distinguishable way (Res indiscreta discrete monstrata est) (s. 308/A, 5)

5 - I am unlearnedly learned (imperite peritus) (doctr. chr. 4, 7, 11)

6 - Our knowledge of God is a learned ignorance (ep. 130, 15, 28)

7 - If you have understood what you want to say, it is not God; if you’ve been able to grasp it, you’ve grasped something else instead of God. If you have understood, God is not like this; but if He is like this, you have not understood (s. 52, 6, 16)

8 - The words by which you express the ineffable divine excellence are unworthy of God’s greatness, whose wisdom, before descending to the level of the human body, has descended to the level of human language; it is, on the contrary, with a divine silence that it must be understood, so that it may divinize human beings. People can give a rational explanation about the reason why it is said like this, but nothing can be worthily said of God; it is even unworthy to have said it (c. Adim. 13, 2)

9 - God, by revealing Himself to Moses from the burning bush, defined Himself: ‘I am who I am’. Inasmuch as He is the highest essence, that is, in the degree of infinite perfection, and therefore He does not become, He has given the being to things, but He has not given them the being in its highest degree, as He is. He gave to some of them more of being, to others less; so He ordered the essences in various degrees. Except what is not, no being exists contrary to the Being who is at the highest degree; therefore no essence contrary to God exists (civ. 12, 2)

10 - God has never begun to be, nor got bored with His loneliness. He has always been and does not become indolent through rest or tired through work. He has indeed the power to remain in Himself in the happiest way, since He Himself is His dwelling (c. adv. leg. 1, 2, 2)

11 - God, therefore, has never had a beginning and will never have an end (c. adv. leg. 1, 2, 3)

12 - In God all the attributes, that is, the essential qualities, are just an identical reality (s. 341, 6, 8)

13 - God is the highest essence, therefore He makes all things exist (vera rel. 11, 22)

14 - God, since He is by nature, depends on Himself (vera rel. 14, 28)

15 - God is the Absolute because He always remains Himself: the Being in the highest degree and eternal, independent of everything, stable and immutable (en. Ps. 121, 5)

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GOD AND MAN

1 - God let Himself be called God (doctr. chr. 1, 6, 6)

2 - Man, without God, is really nothing: nihil est homo (s. 361, 5, 5)

3 - Accept God as He is, not as you wish He might be. Love Him as He is. He does not love you as you are, but hates you in order to make you as you are not yet (s. 9, 9)

4 - Man, if he wants to be something, must turn to the One by whom he has been created (en. Ps. 70, s. 2, 6)

5 - Two things have been proposed to man’s consideration: to know God and to know himself. God, so that he may trust in Him; himself, so that he may not trust in himself. Nothing is dearer to God than God’s image (s. 20/A, 2)

6 - Your God is everywhere: if you don’t get far from Him, He will never disappear to you (Io. ev. tr. 34, 6)

7 - God is silent, but God’s works speak (s. 313/D, 2)

8 - Why does not man see God? Because he obstinately wants to be man. May he start to let oneself be cured and from man may he become son of God (s. suppl. 25, 15)

9 - You worship the God who makes you too gods; the others worship gods made by themselves. Whoever worships them loses the opportunity to become a god, insofar as, by making false gods, alienates himself from the true one (s. suppl. 6, 3)

10 - Every man is a sinner and a mortal being; God, on the contrary, is just and immortal (s. suppl. 26, 39)

11 - God is the good. There is no good for those who forsake Him (nat. b.)

12 - The good that makes good whatever is good is God (s. 61, 3, 3)

13 - The supreme good cannot be but God: by following Him we live well; by possessing Him we live not only well, but also happily (mor. 1, 6, 10)

14 - God, by being the cause of the existence of everything exists, cannot be at the same time also the cause of their non-existence, that is, of their departing from the being and tending towards the non-being. This is evil in its widest meaning (mor. 2, 2, 3)

15 - God loves sinners. He loves what He wants to realize, He does not love what He wants to eliminate (s. 335/I, 5)

16 - The true divine predictions are the work of the only God; the true sacrifice must be offered to the one true God (s. suppl. 23, 16)

17 - She had much because she had God in her heart (s. 107/A, 7)

18 - We need God’s goods, not God our goods (s. suppl. 22, 19)

19 - We remain in Him out of extreme need, He remains in us out of mercy (s. 134, 1, 1)

20 - God is with us in predestining us, in calling us, in justifying us, in glorifying us. If God is with us, who can be against us? (s. 158, 1)

21 - ‘God’s right hand’ stands for ineffable, inestimable, incomprehensible blessedness and completeness (s. 213, 5)

22 - May God renew you; may God keep you and guard you; may God lead you to the one who is eternal life. Amen

23 - God is humble in His greatness, man is humble in his weakness (s. 380, 7)

24 - God is full, you are puffed up (s. suppl. 9, 6)

25 - God is jealous without envy, gets angry without changing, has compassion without experiencing sorrow, regrets without repenting of any wrongdoing, is patient without suffering (pat. 1, 1)

26 - What is better than this good, or happier than this happiness: to live for God and of God, in whom is the source of life and at whose light we see light? (spir. et litt.22, 37)

27 - God will be all in all when we shall start to want nothing except Him. He will indeed be everything for us when we shall need nothing, since He will satisfy us (c. s. arian. 37,34)

28 - When God will be all in all, He will replace everything we need (s. 334, 3)

THE DIVINE OPERATIONS OUTSIDE GOD

Creation and providence

1 - God is what He has, creatures have what they are (conf. 13, 3, 4)

2 - Whoever has without knowing who has given has without having. When what he possesses will be removed from him by God, to him only his own malice will remain (s. 127, 3, 3)

3 - God created the universe wholly: when He wanted, how long He wanted and how He wanted (Gn. litt. 4, 2, 6)

4 - When it is said that God made the creation out of nothing, it is meant that He didn’t make it taking it out of Himself (c. Iul. imp. 5, 31)

5 - All things have been created good by God, who is great in the great things, but not little in the little ones (c. adv. leg. 2, 12, 42)

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7 - The maker of creation knew it very well inside His own soul, where art itself is more beautiful than the objects made by art. An object is perfect if it pleases the artist. The creation pleased God because it was perfect (Gn. c. man. 1, 8, 13)

8 - The way of being of creatures is threefold: their immutable reasons are in the Word of God, they exist as works made by Him until the seventh day, they exist as works that He continues to do afterwards until now (Gn. litt. 5, 12, 28)

The creation of man’s soul

1 - God Himself has shaped the soul, that is, the vital spirit in man. The soul has not been transmitted as Adam’s descendant, but, coming from another source, has been infused into the body and fashions its senses so that man may become a living soul (Gn. litt. 10, 6, 11)

2 - Whatever emanates from God is necessarily of His own nature, and therefore is unchangeable like God. The soul, on the contrary, is changeable, therefore it is not emanated from God. Since it has not been made from another thing, it has been made out of nothing, but it is God who created it (an. et eius or. 1, 4, 4)

3 - Each one draws the kind of his own nature from the same source from which he draws the origin of his own nature (an. et eius or. 1, 19, 32)

4 - God wanted to created man from only one ancestor, so that, through this reminder, the bond of concord among many people might be kept (civ. 12, 27, 1)

5 - You know something important if you know not only that the Creator made man, but also that man was made according to a plan. As far as you are concerned, think that He made you in His image so that you might love Him (s. 68, 5)

6 - Let us contemplate the creatures, let us praise the Creator! (s. 261, 4)

7 - It looks as if the rainbow shines from the clouds like God’s letter, like a reminder (c. adv. leg. 1, 20, 44)

8 - How is it possible that the one who has been created lives and the one who creates does not live? God therefore exists. Woe to us if we doubt it! But whoever doubts must, in his search, start to believe, because without believing he will never find what he searches (div. qu. 23)

9 - How can man watch the works without searching for their author? (s. suppl. 26, 31)

10 - The whole universe sings at one voice (vera rel. 3, 5)

11 - Consider three aspects in creation: who made all creatures, through whom he made them, why he made them. The author is the Father, through His Word, in the goodness of the Holy Spirit. The whole Trinity is therefore made known to us in His works (civ. 11, 24)

12 - God has not created anything unknowingly, since He knows everything. As a consequence, if the world did not exist, it could not be known by us; if it had not been known by God, on the contrary, it would not exist (civ. 11, 10, 3)

13 - There are two reasons why God loves His creation: that it may be, that it may be preserved (Gn. litt. 1, 8, 14)

14 - God acts through eternal, immutable, stable reasons of the Word, who is eternal like Him and, so to say, through a sort of fomentation of the Holy Spirit, eternal as well (Gn. litt. 1, 18, 36)

15 - Realities created by God, since He governs and contains them, have a mode of existence different from what He is in Himself (Gn. litt. 2, 6, 12)

16 - All living creatures have their laws; they all deserve praise, and their transformations or changes from a good into another obey to the specific but hidden beauty unfolding in time (Gn. litt. 3, 16, 25)

17 - The world itself, in its beauty, silently asserts that it has been created by a God of greatness, of inexpressible and invisible beauty (civ. 11, 4, 1)

18 - The non-being is the opposite of the being. No essence contrary to God, that is, to the supreme essence and the creator of all essences, therefore exists (civ. 12, 3)

19 - God does not abandon us after creating us, He didn’t take the trouble to make us without taking the trouble to protect us (s. 26, 1)

20 - The ineffable medical art of the divine Providence even changes the ugliness of vices into a certain kind of beauty (vera rel. 28, 51)

21 - Divine Providence assigns a role to the defeated and another to the defeaters, others to those who fight and to those who are spectators, and finally to the peaceful ones, who contemplate only God in eternal life (vera rel. 40, 76)

22 - God preferred to draw the good from the evil rather than not to allow evil to subsist (ench. 8, 27)

23 - These are the mines of Providence: the good is everywhere (doctr. chr. 2, 40, 60)

24 - No leaf falls without God willing it (s. suppl. 29, 12)

25 - There is no creature that, willingly or unwillingly, is not at the service of divine Providence; all those who, by their will, agree with it, do what is good; in those who rebel, on the contrary, the decrees of the divine justice are fulfilled (Gal. exp. 32)

26 - I cannot see how who even rules out the intervention of divine Providence in our souls may be called religious (mor. 1, 6, 10)

27 - What more could divine Providence have done in order to save man? It never abandoned man when he abandoned God. Now God’s very righteous power operates in a wonderful and incomprehensible way even through mysterious successions of things submitted to God, who exercises both the severity of punishment and the clemency of forgiveness (mor. 1, 7, 12)

28 - Nothing, under the sublime governance of divine Providence, happens in an irrational way, even if the reason is hidden (civ. 12, 27, 1)

29 - The more things are done with measure, form and order, the more they are indeed good. These three aspects are like general goods present in the realities made by God, both in the spirit and in the body (nat. b. 3)

30 - To understand this we should have a global vision of the whole, in which the single particles of the single events harmonize with convenient proportion. Because of this, we are advised to have faith, in order to accept what we don’t understand by means of reason (civ. 12, 4)

31 - Religious discussion about good and evil comes to nothing, except if we acknowledge that everything that exists, inasmuch as it exists, comes from God, while, insofar as it deviates from His essence, it does not come from God, although it is still ordered by divine Providence, as it is suitable to all reality (mor. 2, 7, 10)

32 - Divine Providence does not immediately repay everyone for the evil committed, but only some people; this is to tell us that it watches over all, while keeping its infinite patience (en. Ps. 30, II, s. 3, 12)

33 - Usually divine Providence radically reforms, through crises and wars, the corrupt behaviour of individuals and tests the life praiseworthily honest of people, both in order to preserve it on earth for other tasks and to reward it in eternal life (civ. 1, 1)

34 - Nature’s Creator is also its Saviour. We should not praise the Creator in such a way that we may be impelled, or even convinced, to consider the Saviour as superfluous (nat. et gr. 34, 39)

35 - We defend God’s cause better when we recognize Him as Creator and Saviour, instead of making the help of the Saviour empty by defending a creature, as if this creature were sound and unimpaired in its strength (nat. et gr. 42, 49)

36 - God became man so that man might become God (s. 371, 1)

37 - What do you love so much that you don’t love God? Tell me. Love, if you can, something that He has not created. Look around and investigate about the whole creation. You admire creation because you cannot see Him. On the contrary, through the things you admire, you must love the one whom you cannot see!

III - THE TRINITY

The Life of the three divine Persons

1 - He was, He was, He was in the beginning (s. 135, 3, 4)

2 - The Trinity is Trinity in such a way that He is one God; God is one in such a way that He is Trinity (Gn. litt. imp. 16, 61)

3 - The divine persons, although they are three and each of them singularly is God, are not three gods. The entire Trinity is only one God (c. s. arian. 15, 9)

4 - ‘In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit’. In the name, not in the names, because the three are only one thing, one God (c. Max. 2, 22, 3)

5 - We are dealing with something ineffable, which cannot be expressed by words. The number is there and is not there. Yes, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit are three, but what are these three? God does not escape the number, but is not bound by the number either… If you want to know what the three are, there is no longer use in the number. When you start to think you start to count; once you have counted you cannot draw conclusions. The number only suggests what They are to each other, not what They are by Themselves (Io. ev. tr. 39, 4)

6 - The Son comes from the Father by generation: the Holy Spirit comes from the Father and the Son by procession... The author of the procession is the Father inasmuch as, by generating the Son, granted Him that also from Him the Holy Spirit might proceed (c. Max. 2, 14, 1)

7 - No one is able to explain the difference between being generated and proceeding in talking of that very excellent divine nature. Not everything that proceeds is generated, although everything that is generated proceeds; personally, I am not able to distinguish between this generation and this procession (c. Max. 2, 14, 1)

8 - The works of the Trinity are inseparable. Only about the Father we don’t read that He was sent, since He has no author from which He might have been generated or from which He might proceed. And this is asserted not because of any difference in nature, which does not exist in the Trinity, but it is just because it was authoritatively said that we know that the Father was not sent. It is not the splendour or the heat which sends the fire, but the other way around: the fire sends both the splendour and the heat (c. s. arian. 4, 4)

9 - The Father operates through the reasons of the Word and the incubation, so to say, of the Holy Spirit (Gn. litt. 1, 18, 36)

10 - The Trinity is the only God, by whom we have been created, by whose likeness we are formed into unity and by whose peace we adhere to unity. He is the principle to which we return, the form we follow and the grace through which we are reconciled (vera rel. 55, 113)

11 - From Him, through Him and in Him are all things. From Him as from the one who owes nobody what He is; through Him as through a mediator; in Him as in the one who contains, that is, who unites (f. et symb. 9, 19)

12 - In the Father there is unity, in the Son equality, in the Holy Spirit the harmony of unity and equality. And these three things are one because of the Father, are equal because of the Son, are communicating among themselves because of the Holy Spirit (doctr. chr. 1, 5, 5)

13 - In the Trinity the essence or nature is considered simple because in it being/existing/having identify, except that the three persons are said relatively one of the other. The Father has in fact the Son, but He is not the Son, and vice versa. In God, therefore, being and having are identified only on the basis of the attributes given in an absolute and not in a relative sense. In an absolute sense, for example, God is said to be living by having, of course, life, but He is Himself life (civ. 11, 10, 1)

14 - Whatever is said of that most eminent and divine sublimity in respect to itself, is said in respect to the substance, but what is said in relation to anything, is not said in respect to the substance, but relatively; and the effect of the same substance in Father, Son and Holy Spirit is such that whatever is said of each in respect to Themselves is to be taken of them, not in the plural, but in the singular. The Father is God and the Son is God and the Holy Spirit is God; there are, nevertheless, not three gods, but one God. The Father is great, the Son is great and the Holy Spirit is great; yet there are not three greats, but one great (trin. 5, 8, 9)

15 - And so there is a kind of image of the Trinity (in man’s spirit), the mind itself and the knowledge of it, which is its offspring and its word concerning itself, and love (proceeding from the will) as a third, and these three are one reality and one substance. Neither is the offspring less, since the mind knows itself according to the measure of its own being; nor is the love less, since it loves itself according to the measure both of its own knowledge and of its own being (trin. 9, 12, 18)

16 - You see the Trinity if you see charity. When we love charity we love charity who loves something, since that is not love which loves nothing. But if it loves itself it must love something, so that it may love itself with charity. What, therefore, does charity love except what we love with charity? And this is brotherly love: ‘Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God; and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God. The one who does not love does not know God, for God is love’ [1 John 4:7-8]. The reason why one does not see God is that he does not love his brother or sister. But if he loved with spiritual charity the person whom he sees with human sight, he would see God by means of an inner sight (trin. 8, 8, 12)

17 - We must love God as a certain trine unity: the Father, the Son, the Holy Spirit are nothing else than the being itself. God, in fact, is in a true and supreme way (mor. 1, 14, 24)

18 - The three divine persons come to us when we go to Them: They come to us by helping us, we go to Them by obeying; They come to us by enlightening us, we go to Them by contemplating; They come by filling us with Their presence, we go to Them by welcoming Them (Io. ev. tr. 76, 4)

19 - God’s essence has nothing changeable in eternity, in truth and in will. In God truth and love are eternal; love and eternity are true; eternity and truth are lovable (trin. 4, 1, 1)

20 - When I love, there are three things: I, what I love and love itself. For I do not love love, except when I love a lover; since there is no love where nothing is loved. In fact, he who loves and what is loved are the same when anyone loves himself. But it is one thing to love one's self, another to love one's own love. Love, as a matter of fact, is not loved, unless as already loving something, inasmuch as where nothing is loved there is no love (trin. 9, 2, 2)

21 - The mind, the love of it and the knowledge of it are three things, and these three are one; when they are perfect they are equal (trin. 9, 4, 4)

22 - Memory, intelligence and will, are not three lives, but one life. Each one of them, in respect to itself, is life, mind and substance; but they are called memory, intelligence and will relatively to something. And these three are one (trin. 10, 11, 18)

23 - Embrace God-love and embrace God with love (trin. 8, 8, 12)

The Father, giver of Life

1 - The beginning has relation to fatherhood... By this you know the fathers: they become fathers by acknowledging the One who is from the beginning (Io. ep. tr. 2, 5)

2 - Supremely one is the Father of Truth, Father of His own Wisdom, which, insofar as It is completely similar to Him, is said to be His likeness and image, since It is from Him (vera rel. 43, 81)

3 - God is our Father, the Church our Mother: we are therefore brethren (s. 56, 10, 14)

4 - Each one of us has his or her own father on earth, but all together we have only one Father in heaven: ‘Our Father who are in heaven’. It is really Him you call upon as Father. And this only Father wanted to have for Himself only one bride. If we, therefore, worship only one Father, why don’t we acknowledge only one mother? If you assert that another mother bore you, it means that another womb generated you (s. Caes. eccl. 5)

5 - How have You loved us, O good Father, who did not spare Your only Son, but delivered Him up for us wicked ones! How have You loved us, for whom He, who thought it no robbery to be equal with You, but became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross... both priest and sacrifice, and priest as being the sacrifice (conf. 10, 43, 69)

6 - Let us consider, my dear ones, whose we started to be children; let us live in a way suitable to those who have such a Father. You see that our Creator deemed it worthy to be our Father (s. 57, 2, 2)

7 - ‘Our Father’, in this way both the general and the beggar pray Him, both the servant and his master. They say together: ‘Our Father’. They, therefore, understand that they are brothers, since they have one Father. Let the master not disdain to have his servant as brother, since Christ the Lord wanted to have him as brother (s. 58, 2, 2)

8 - The requests of the Lord’s prayer are seven. Three of them have to do with eternal life: hallowed be Your name, Your kingdom come, Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven; four of them have to do with present life: give us this day our daily bread, forgive us our debts, lead us not into temptation, deliver us from evil. This prayer not only encourages you to pray, but also to learn what you must desire (s. 59, 5, 8)

9 - Think who is the one to whom we say: ‘Our Father who are in heaven’. He is not a friend or a neighbour. He is one who commands us to be of one mind. We have together one voice toward the Father, why don’t we have at the same time one peace? (s. 357, 4)

The Son, Word of the Father and light of Truth

1 - The Word, Son of God, is, yes, distinct from the Father, but He is not another thing: He is another person, not a different nature. He is absolutely all the Father is, except that He is the Son and not the Father (an. et eius or. 2, 5, 9)

2 - We know that the Son of God, as Son, is not from Himself, but was begotten by the Father. We know that the Father has not been begotten: He is from no one, He has received life from no one. The Son has received life from the Father, but not as if He, for some time, had no life, and received it later. Indeed the Father gave Him life by begetting life: while begetting Him as life gave Him life. The Father has life in Himself, the Son has an equal life as the Father has; the Son, nevertheless, has not received life from Himself, because He has not been born from Himself, but from the Father… He received life from the Father because He was born as life from the Father (coll. Max. 13)

3 - Between the Father and the Son there is only this difference: the Father has life in Himself without having received it from anyone, while the Son has in Himself the life the Father has given Him (Io. ev. tr. 19, 11)

4 - The Father is principle that does not come from any principle; the Son is principle that comes from a principle. Both together They are not two principles, but only one principle, as the Father is God and the Son is God, but together They are not two gods, but one God (c. Max. 2, 17, 4)

5 - The Father, who is source, begot the Son, who is source. Yes, the source begot the source; but the source that begets and the source that is begotten are just one source, as God who begets and God who is begotten are just one God, that is, the Son begotten by the Father. The Father and the Son are one thing because one is the substance and God is one because divinity is indivisible (s. 217, 1)

6 - Whatever the Son says is said by the Father too inasmuch as, when He speaks, the Father utters His Word, which is His Son. By speaking, so to say, in His eternal way of being, God the Father utters the Word coeternal to Him (Gn. litt. 1, 5, 11)

7 - Since the Son is the great Word of the Father, are lesser words uttered between the Father and the Son? Remove everything is corporeal and see simplicity, if you are simple (Io. ev. tr. 23, 8)

8 - Inasmuch as the Son is image of the Father, He is His power and His wisdom. He is, indeed, His full and perfect image, that is, not created from nothing, but begotten by Him, having nothing less than the one of whom He is the image. The Only Begotten Son is the supreme image of the Father, an image so similar that, in it, nothing is different (c. s. arian. 26, 22)

9 - The Son knows everything the Father knows; but to Him to know, as to be, is from the Father, since to know and to be are one. Accordingly, it is as though uttering Himself that the Father begot the Word equal to Himself in all things. And here is recognized in the highest sense that ‘Yea, yea; nay, nay’. The Son can do nothing of Himself, but what He sees the Father do. Through power He cannot do this; nor is it infirmity, but strength, by which truth cannot be false. Therefore God the Father knows all things in Himself, knows all things in the Son; in Himself as Himself, in the Son as His own Word, which is from all those things that are in Himself (trin. 15, 14, 23)

10 - ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God’. My Father inasmuch as I am His Only Begotten Son, your Father inasmuch as you have been adopted; my God inasmuch as I was made man, your God inasmuch as you are always men. And again: ‘From my mother’s womb You are my God’. Before my mother’s womb You are my Father, from my mother’s womb You are my God (s. 229/L, 2)

11 - It would not have been suitable if the begetter had been sent by the begotten; it was rather suitable that the begotten was sent by the begetter. This is not inequality of substance, but of order; not that one was before the other, but that one comes from the other (c. Max. 2, 14, 8)

12 - The sacred texts talk of a Son who is at the same time only-begotten and first-born: only-begotten because He has no brethren, first-born because He has brethren. The Catholic faith, which distinguishes between Creator and creature, does not have any difficulty in understanding these two terms: He is only-begotten according to His divinity, He is first-born in virtue of His fraternal fellowship with men, whom the Father generated not by the equality of substance with Him, but by the adoption of grace (c. Sec. 5)

13 - In fact, and Moses bore witness to Christ, and John bore witness to Christ, and all the other prophets and apostles bore witness to Christ. But yet, in another way, God bears testimony to His Son: God reveals His Son through the Son Himself, He reveals Himself through the Son. If man shall have been able to reach Him, he shall not need any lamps and, by truly digging deep, he will build his building on the rock (Io. ev. tr. 23, 4)

14 - The Son knows the Father by Himself; we know Him by the Son (Io. ev. tr. 47, 3)

The Holy Spirit, fire of Love

1 - In this Trinity the Son and none other is called the Word of God, and the Holy Spirit and none other the Gift of God, and God the Father alone is He from whom the Word is born, and from whom the Holy Spirit principally proceeds. Principally, because we find that the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Son as well, but the Father gave Him this too by begetting Him. In this way, the Holy Spirit is their common gift, the Spirit of both (trin. 15, 17, 29)

2 - The Holy Spirit is the Gift of God insofar as He is given to those who, through Him, love God (trin. 15, 19, 35)

3 - When we say that the Father and Jesus Christ are the true God, we say it in such a manner that the Holy Spirit may not be excluded in any way from the reality of divinity (c. Max. 2, 15, 4)

4 - The Holy Spirit is the mutual love of the Father and of the Son: God is love. Who can, therefore, name the Father and the Son without consideration of the love of the Father and of the Son? (Io. ev. tr. 9, 8)

5 - The Holy Spirit comes forth from the Father, not as born, but as given; and so He is not called son, because He was neither born, as the Only-begotten, nor made as we are. For what is born of the Father, is referred to the Father only when called Son, and so the Son is the Son of the Father, and not also ours; but what is given is referred both to Him who gave and to those to whom He gave, and therefore also to us (trin. 5, 14, 15)

6 - The Holy Spirit is love: He is specially called that, which the Father and the Son are in common (trin. 15, 19, 37)

7 - The Holy Spirit is the consubstantial and coeternal communion itself of the love of the Father and of the Son… For if love is less great in God than wisdom, then wisdom is loved in a lesser degree than according to what it is; but wisdom is equal with the Father, therefore also the Holy Spirit is equal; and if equal, equal in all things, on account of the absolute simplicity which is in that substance (trin. 6, 5, 7)

8 - The Holy Spirit does not dwell in anyone without the Father and the Son, just as the Son without the Father and the Holy Spirit. The dwelling of the three Persons is inseparable, as it is the operating; They nevertheless mostly manifest Themselves separately, not in each one’s own nature, but by means of creatures that represent Them (s. 71, 20, 33)

9 - What a great God is the one who gives God! (trin. 15, 26, 46)

10 - What a great good is that, without which goods so great bring no one to eternal life! (trin. 15, 18, 32)

11 - The Holy Spirit is a gift eternally, but has been given in time (trin. 5, 16, 17)

12 - Love beggarly and needy (Gn. litt. 1, 7, 13)

13 - The Holy Spirit: a restorer of freedom and a guide to freedom (Gal. exp. 54)

14 - Receive the Holy Spirit on earth so that you may love your brothers and sisters, receive the Holy Spirit from heaven so that you may love God (s. 265, 8, 9)

15 - The Lord has given us the Spirit as a pledge, so that in Him we may feel His sweetness and desire the source itself of life, where, with sober ebriety, we are inundated and watered. Such an ebriety does not upset the mind, but drags it upwards, and grants the forgetfulness of all earthly things (agon. 9, 10)

16 - The Holy Spirit is God’s love poured out into our hearts, not the love by which God loves us, but the love by which He makes us able to love Him (spir. et litt. 32, 56)

17 - May the Lord be present to your mind, and by His Spirit pour into your spirit such readiness of humility, such light of truth, such sweetness of charity and such peace of piety, that you may prefer being a conqueror of your spirit in truth than of anyone who contradicts in falsehood (an. et eius or. 3, 15, 23)

18 - We must have the Holy Spirit in our hearts every day… Christ espoused His Church and sent to her the Holy Spirit, who is like the wedding ring; and the one who has given her the ring will give her also immortality and rest. Let us love Him, hope in Him, believe in Him (s. suppl. 31, 9)

19 - What the soul is to the human body, the Holy Spirit is to the body of Christ, which is the Church. He operates in the whole Church what the soul operates in all the members of one body (s. 267, 4)

20 - Whoever loves has the Holy Spirit and, by having Him, he deserves to have Him more abundantly and, in this way, he will be able to love more. This gift of the Holy Spirit brings a deeper knowledge of the gift itself, which makes it greater (Io. ev. tr. 74, 2)

21 - May the Holy Spirit come to your help: He will not think it unseemly to be the doorkeeper. About the Spirit the Lord says: ‘He will guide you into all the truth’ [John 16:13]. What is the door? Christ. What is Christ? The truth. Who opens the door, unless the one who guides into all truth? (Io. ev. tr. 46, 4)

22 - The Holy Spirit does not speak by Himself, but listens to the one from whom He proceeds. To Him listening is knowing and knowing is being. He, therefore, owes His knowledge to the one from whom He receives His essence; His listening is nothing else than His knowing (Io. ev. tr. 99, 4)

23 - If you want to live by the Holy Spirit, keep charity, love truth, desire unity and you shall reach eternity. Amen (s. 267, 4)

24 - Without the Spirit, the letter of the law kills, since it does not set the sinner free, but rather makes him liable. When you are commanded to do something according to the law, ask the Spirit that He may help you (s. 229/M, 2)

25 - Those who despair or ridicule and despise the preaching of grace, by which sins are forgiven, or of peace, by which we are reconciled with God, and refuse, until the end, to repent of their own sins, they are those who sin against the Holy Spirit (Rom. inch. exp. 14)

26 - The Holy Spirit, who shows Himself reconciled and gracious to the meek and humble in heart, and gives them rest, shows Himself an inexorable adversary to the violent and haughty, and vexes them with disquiet (ep. 55, 16, 29)

27 - Since the Holy Spirit is God, let us love God through God (s. 34, 3)

28 - We cannot say that someone who mingles with the sheep of Christ just physically and not by heart is in the Church and belongs to this society of the Spirit. The Holy Spirit of discipline, in fact, flees hypocrisy (s. 71, 19, 32)

29 - The Holy Spirit sanctifies the people in whom He dwells, while they make progress by being renewed day by day; He grants their prayers and purifies them in the confession of faith, so that they may become an immaculate temple for eternity… Even if, on the last day of their life, they have not reached the stage of spiritual intelligence, their divine indweller will fill all the gaps of their understanding, since they have never separated themselves from the unity of the body of Christ and from the communion of the temple of God… In a certain way they sweat in the effort of walking, that is, of progressing on the way of perfection, while obtaining from God, through the piety of faith, the perspicuity of intelligence (ep. 187, 8, 29)

IV - GOD’S OPERATIONS OUTSIDE HIMSELF

The creator

1 - God is what He has, creatures have what they are (conf. 13, 3, 4)

2 - Whoever has without knowing who has given to him has without having. When what he possesses shall be removed from him by God, to him only his own malice shall remain (s. 127, 3, 3)

3 - God created the universe wholly: when He wanted, how long He wanted and how He wanted (Gn. litt. 4, 2, 6)

4 - When it is said that God made the creation out of nothing, it is meant that He didn’t make it by taking it out of Himself (c. Iul. imp. 5, 31)

5 - All things have been created good by God, who is great in the great things, but not little in the little ones (c. adv. leg. 2, 12, 42)

6 - To create also means to regulate and to give order to all reality, so that it may grow and reach perfection (mor. 2, 7, 9)

7 - The maker of creation knew it very well inside His own soul, where art itself is more beautiful than the objects made by art. An object is perfect if it pleases the artist. The creation pleased God because it was perfect (Gn. c. man. 1, 8, 13)

8 - The way of being of creatures is threefold: their immutable reasons are in the Word of God; they exist as works made by Him until the seventh day; they exist as works He continues to do afterwards until now (Gn. litt. 5, 12, 28)

The universe

1 - Let us contemplate the creature, let us praise the Creator (s. 261, 4)

2 - The entire universe sings with one voice (vera rel. 3, 5)

3 - Things, in their own order, are sketches of the Trinity (trin. 15, 2, 3)

4 - There are two reasons why God loves His creation: that it may be, that it may be preserved (Gn. litt. 1, 8, 14)

5 - If we are near the eternal creator, necessarily we will be made eternal too (vera rel. 10, 19)

6 - Realities created by God, since He governs and contains them, have a mode of existence different from what He is in Himself (Gn. litt. 2, 6, 12)

7 - ‘In the beginning God created heaven and earth’ - ‘In the beginning was the Word’. That is: God created the universe in His Son, through whom all things have been made. In such a way Genesis and Gospel agree (s. 1, 2)

8 - All living creatures have their own laws; their transformations or changes from one thing into another obey to the specific but hidden beauty unfolding in time (Gn. litt. 3, 16, 25)

9 - The very good creator of the good natures is the very righteous regulator of the bad wills (civ. 11, 17)

10 - Even if some natures become individually ugly because of sin, the universe remains, with the inclusion of them, always beautiful (Gn. litt. 3, 24, 37)

11 - Creatures exist from God, through God and in God (en. Ps. 101, s. 2, 12)

Faithful and rebel angels

1 - We know by faith that God created His angels as pure spirits; they are although angels -or messengers- inasmuch as they are His ministers and sent to man. The word ‘angel’ indicates their assignment, not their nature. An angelic being, for what he is, is spirit; for what he does he is an angel (en. Ps. 103, s. 1, 15)

2 - If it is the creation of angels what is meant in the passage where God said: ‘Let there be light’ (Genesis 1:3), that means that the angels were made sharers of the eternal light, which is the immutable wisdom itself of God, that is, the only-begotten Son of the Father. Being illuminated by the Light by which they had been created, they were meant to become light forever, by partaking of God’s eternal day. Every faithful angel becomes, in this way, light, not in himself but in God. If an angel turns away from Him, he becomes a rebel: he is no longer light in the Lord, but darkness in himself, since he has been deprived of the participation in the eternal light. There is no essence of evil, but what is considered evil is in fact the loss of the good (civ. 11, 9)

3 - The angels always see the face of the Father and therefore of the whole Trinity, since they see through the Son and in the Holy Spirit (c. ep. pel. 3, 7, 18)

4 - The angelic spirits, in the act itself of creation, were created as light and were also illuminated so that they might live in wisdom and happiness. Some of them turned away from their illumination and therefore did not achieve the sublimity of the wise and happy life, which is undoubtedly eternal and firmly certain of its own eternity. They have anyway the life of intelligence, even if in a condition of permanent folly and injustice, insofar as they have rejected the eternal life of God (civ. 11, 11)

5 - ‘And God separated the light from the darkness’ (Genesis 1:4), that is, He divided the holy society of the angels, shining in the world of the intelligible through the enlightening of truth, and the darkness opposed to Him, which means the tenebrous spirits of the rebel angels, who had turned away from the light of justice (civ. 11, 19)

6 - Angels don’t need books, commentators, readers. Their reading is their vision, since they see the truth itself and are satiated at that source, from which we get only drops (s. 57, 7, 7)

7 - What is the name of the angelic nature? Spirit. What is its assignment? Being an angel or messenger. An angel is a spirit because of what he is, he is an angel because of what he does (en. Ps. 103, s. 1, 15)

8 - The faithful angels remain firmly in the eternal good, which is God, and in His eternity, truth and love. The rebel angels, on the contrary, desirous of their own power, as if they were something good by themselves, are cast down from the supreme and beatifying universal good to particular goods. And since they replaced the highest eternity with the display of pride, the evident truth with the fallacy of vanity, unifying love with the taste of factiousness, they have become proud, deceitful, bringers of hatred. A creature is unhappy if it loses God; God, on the contrary, cannot be unhappy because He cannot lose Himself (civ. 12, 1, 2)

9 - The prince of the angels fell down from heaven together with his companions; but men will ascend to occupy the place from which those angels fell. And since the devil saw that man would reach the place which once was his own, full of envy he wanted to throw him down. Man fell, but God went down and became man (s. 229/H, 2)

10 - ‘You will see the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man’. May the angels of God ascend and descend. May this be done in the Church. The Head is above, His members are here on earth: may the angels ascend to Him and descend to His members. Christ is there, Christ is here (en. Ps. 44, 20)

Man

1 - God wanted to created man from only one ancestor, so that, through this reminder, the bond of concord among many people might be kept (civ. 12, 27, 1)

2 - Adam’s voice is the voice of the entire humankind (s. suppl. 21, 2)

3 - The four letters of the name ‘Adam’ indicate, in Greek, the four cardinal points: anatolé, dúsis, árktos, mesembría. By putting these words one under the other and by reading their initials we have ‘ADAM’: East, West, North, South (Io. ev. tr. 9, 14)

4 - Adam is the upside-down prefiguration of the future Christ (c. Iul. imp. 3, 107)

5 - Adam, while sleeping, deserved to receive the bride whom God had shaped from his side. From Christ, sleeping on the cross, the Church was born, since from His side, hit by the spear, the sacraments of the Church flowed. Christ’s weakness makes us strong (Io. ev. tr. 15, 8)

6 - How can man watch the works without searching for their author? (s. suppl. 26, 31)

7 - Consider three aspects in creation: who made every creature, through what He made them and why He made them. The author is the Father, through His Word, in the goodness of the Holy Spirit. The whole Trinity is therefore shown to us in His works (civ. 11, 24)

The creation of man’s soul

1 - God Himself has shaped the soul, that is, the vital spirit in man. The soul has not been transmitted as Adam’s descendant, but, coming from another source, has been infused into the body and fashions its senses so that man may become a living soul (Gn. litt. 10, 6, 11)

2 - Whatever emanates from God is necessarily of His own nature and therefore is unchangeable like God. The soul, on the contrary, is changeable, therefore it is not emanated from God. Since it has not been made from another thing, it has been made out of nothing, but it is God who created it (an. et eius or. 1, 4, 4)

3 - Each one draws the kind of his own nature from the same source from which he draws the origin of his own nature (an. et eius or. 1, 19, 32)

4 - You know something important if you know not only that the Creator made man, but also that man was made according to a plan. As far as you are concerned, think that He made you in His image so that you might love Him (s. 68, 5)

5 - The rainbow seems to shine from the clouds like letters, written as a reminder for God (c. adv. leg. 1, 20, 44)

6 - How is it possible that the one who has been created lives and the one who creates does not live? God therefore exists. Woe to us if we doubt it! But whoever doubts must, in his search, start to believe, because without believing he will never find what he searches (div. qu. 23)

7 - God has not created anything unknowingly, since He knows everything. As a consequence, if the world did not exist, it could not be known by us; if it had not been known by God, on the contrary, it would not exist (civ. 11, 10, 3)

8 - God acts through eternal, immutable, stable reasons of the Word, who is eternal like Him and, so to say, through a sort of fomentation of the Holy Spirit, eternal as well (Gn. litt. 1, 18, 36)

9 - The world itself, in its beauty, silently asserts that it has been created by a God of greatness, of inexpressible and invisible beauty (civ. 11, 4, 1)

10 - The non-being is the opposite of the being. No essence contrary to God, that is, to the supreme essence and the creator of all essences, therefore exists (civ. 12, 3)

The relationship between God and man

1 - God let Himself be called God (doctr. chr. 1, 6, 6)

2 - Man, without God, is really nothing: nihil est homo (s. 361, 5, 5)

3 - Accept God as He is, not as you wish He might be. Love Him as He is. He does not love you as you are, but hates you in order to make you as you are not yet (s. 9, 9)

4 - Man, if he wants to be something, must turn to the One by whom he has been created (en. Ps. 70, s. 2, 6)

5 - We departed from God by ceasing to be similar to Him, but He didn’t allow us to perish (vera rel. 55, 113)

6 - Man cannot object at all to God’s power (s. 269, 2)

7 - Yield to God, because He is God (s. 15/A, 8)

8 - God’s image subdues the beasts, and God shall not subdue His own image? (s. 55, 3, 3)

9 - Empty images are like painted foods (vera rel. 51, 100)

10 - God offers Himself to us in the form of a gain. He cries out: ‘Love Me and you shall possess Me, because, without possessing Me, you cannot even love Me’ (s. 34, 5)

11 - Love God so that God may love you, and you cannot show how much you love God, unless you show that you love His interests (s. 296, 13)

12 - Don’t ask anything of God, except God. Love gratuitously, desire from Him only Himself. Don’t be afraid of poverty: He gives Himself for us and He is enough for us. May He give Himself and this is enough (s. 331, 5, 4)

13 - God must be shown and must be shown to man. No man can show Him: He Himself shows Himself. I can only suggest to you what you may do to deserve to see Him (s. suppl. 23, 8)

14 - God’s face, my brothers and sisters, is so sweet, so beautiful, that, after seeing it, nothing else can delight us! (s. 170, 9)

15 - The whole of our prize will be to see God (s. suppl. 23, 1)

16 - You tell me: ‘Show me your God’. I tell you: ‘Show me your soul’ (s. suppl. 23, 9)

17 - Let me know myself, let me know You [noverim me, noverim te] (sol. 2, 1, 1)

18 - Two things have been proposed to man’s consideration: to know God and to know himself. God, so that he may trust in Him; himself, so that he may not trust in himself. Nothing is dearer to God than God’s image (s. 20/A, 2)

19 - Your God is everywhere: if you don’t get far from Him, He will never disappear to you (Io. ev. tr. 34, 6)

20 - God is silent, but God’s works speak (s. 313/D, 2)

21 - Why does not man see God? Because he obstinately wants to be man. May he start to let oneself be cured and from man may he become son of God (s. suppl. 25, 15)

22 - You worship the God who makes you too gods; the others worship gods made by themselves. Whoever worships them loses the opportunity to become a god, insofar as, by making false gods, alienates himself from the true one (s. suppl. 6, 3)

23 - Every man is a sinner and a mortal being; God, on the contrary, is just and immortal (s. suppl. 26, 39)

24 - God is the good. There is no good for those who forsake Him (nat. b. 7)

25 - The good that makes good whatever is good is God (s. 61, 3, 3)

26 - The supreme good cannot be but God: by following Him we live well; by possessing Him we live not only well, but also happily (mor. 1, 6, 10)

27 - God, by being the cause of the existence of everything exists, cannot be at the same time also the cause of their non-existence, that is, of their departing from the being and tending towards the non-being. This is evil in its widest meaning (mor. 2, 2, 3)

28 - God loves sinners. He loves what He wants to realize, He does not love what He wants to eliminate (s. 335/I, 5)

29 - The true divine predictions are the work of the only God; the true sacrifice must be offered to the one true God (s. suppl. 23, 16) - She had plenty because she had God in her heart (s. 107/A, 7)

30 - We need God’s goods, not God our goods (s. suppl. 22, 19)

31- We remain in Him out of extreme need, He remains in us out of mercy (s. 134, 1, 1)

32 - God is with us in predestining us, in calling us, in justifying us, in glorifying us. If God is with us, who can be against us? (s. 158, 1)

33 - ‘God’s right hand’ stands for ineffable, inestimable, incomprehensible blessedness and completeness (s. 213, 5)

34 - May God renew you; may God keep you and guard you; may God lead you to the one who is eternal life. Amen

35 - God is humble in His greatness, man is humble in his weakness (s. 380, 7)

36 - God is full, you are puffed up (s. suppl. 9, 6)

37 - God is jealous without envy, gets angry without changing, has compassion without experiencing sorrow, regrets without repenting of any wrongdoing, is patient without suffering (pat. 1, 1)

38 - O Lord, you can console, sustain, frighten! (en. Ps. 99, 8)

39 - God will be all in all when we shall start to want nothing except Him. He will indeed be everything for us when we shall need nothing, since He will satisfy us (c. s. arian. 37, 34)

40 - When God shall be all in all, He shall replace everything we need (s. 334, 3)

Providence

1 - God does not abandon us after creating us, He didn’t take the trouble to make us without taking the trouble to protect us (s. 26, 1)

2 - The ineffable medical art of the divine Providence even changes the ugliness of vices into a certain kind of beauty (vera rel. 28, 51)

3 - Divine Providence assigns a role to the defeated and another to the defeaters, others to those who fight and to those who are spectators, and finally to the peaceful ones, who contemplate only God in eternal life (vera rel. 40, 76)

4 - God preferred to draw good from evil rather than not to allow evil to subsist (ench. 8, 27)

5 - These are the mines of Providence: the good is everywhere (doctr. chr. 2, 40, 60)

6 - No leaf falls without God willing it (s. suppl. 29, 12)

7 - There is no creature that, willingly or unwillingly, is not at the service of divine Providence; all those who, by their will, agree with it, do what is good; in those who rebel, on the contrary, the decrees of the divine justice are fulfilled (Gal. exp. 32)

8 - I cannot see how who even rules out the intervention of divine Providence in our souls may be called religious (mor. 1, 6, 10)

9 - What more could divine Providence have done in order to save man? It never abandoned man when he abandoned God. Now God’s very righteous power operates in a wonderful and incomprehensible way even through mysterious successions of things submitted to God, who exercises both the severity of punishment and the clemency of forgiveness (mor. 1, 7, 12)

10 - Nothing, under the sublime governance of divine Providence, happens in an irrational way, even if the reason is hidden (civ. 12, 27, 1)

11 - The more things are done with measure, form and order, the more they are indeed good. These three aspects are like general goods present in the realities made by God, both in the spirit and in the body (nat. b. 3)

12 - To understand this we should have a global vision of the whole, in which the single particles of the single events harmonize with convenient proportion. Because of this, we are advised to have faith, in order to accept what we don’t understand by means of reason (civ. 12, 4)

13 - Religious discussion about good and evil comes to nothing, unless we acknowledge that everything exists, inasmuch as it exists, comes from God, while, insofar as it deviates from His essence, it does not come from God, although it is still ordered by divine Providence, as it is suitable to all reality (mor. 2, 7, 10)

14 - Divine Providence does not immediately repay everyone for the evil committed, but only some people; this is to tell us that it watches over all, while keeping its infinite patience (en. Ps. 30, II, s. 3, 12)

15 - Usually divine Providence radically reforms, through crises and wars, the corrupt behaviour of individuals and tests the life praiseworthily honest of people, both in order to preserve it on earth for other tasks and to reward it in eternal life (civ. 1, 1)

16 - Nature’s Creator is also its Saviour. We should not praise the Creator in such a way that we may be impelled, or even convinced, to consider the Saviour as superfluous (nat. et gr. 34, 39)

17 - We defend God’s cause better when we recognize Him as Creator and Saviour, instead of making the help of the Saviour empty by defending a creature, as if this creature were sound and unimpaired in its strength (nat. et gr. 42, 49)

18 - God became man so that man might become God (s. 371, 1)

19 - What do you love so much that you don’t love God? Tell me. Love, if you can, something that He has not created. Look around and investigate about the whole creation. You admire creation because you cannot see Him. On the contrary, through the things you admire, you must love the one whom you cannot see! (en. Ps. 79, 14)

Justice

1 - Wherever the supreme justice is, the supreme wisdom is as well (c. prisc. et orig. 10, 13)

2 - If God’s justice is at stake, only God is responsible for justice (s. 397, 2, 2)

3 - He who judges is superior to what is judged (vera rel. 29, 53)

4 - One is the way God judges, another the way God commands man to judge, since God is, without any doubt, juster than man (c. Iul. imp. 3, 12)

5 - Justice is based on God’s law (s. 83, 5, 6)

6 - Our justice is He: God! (pat. 20, 17)

7 - Man is just insofar as he is saved (spir. et litt. 29, 51)

8 - No just thing displeases a just person (vera rel. 22, 43)

9 - The righteous person serves freely, the unrighteous one serves in chains (agon. 7, 7)

10 - When you have to show yourself in front of the Judge, be yourself your judge. You sinned? Accuse yourself. You acted well? Praise God (s. suppl. 8, 4.6)

11 - If you have despised mercy, you shall feel the weight of truth; but if you have not despised mercy, you shall rejoice in truth (en. Ps. 39, 19)

12 - The judge is not just any peasant whosoever handling a trident, but God Trinity (en. Ps. 49, 13)

13 - Who is the one who does not judge with partiality? The one who loves everybody equally. Universal love avoids favoritism (Io. ev. tr. 30, 8)

14 - Must God’s judgment be feared or rather loved? The evil ones must fear it because it will bring punishment, the good ones must love it because it will bring the crown (en. Ps. 100, 2)

15 - Rejoicing because of injustice is the insolence of a soul exulting disorderedly (s. dom. m. 2, 25, 83)

16 - If you listen to your neighbour as you listen to yourself, you will persecute the sins while sparing the sinner (s. 13, 8)

17 - Against the accusations and the low insinuations of men, brothers and sisters, let us take God as our judge, as our witness. The one who one day will be the judge will not refuse to be the witness (Io. ev. tr. 36, 11)

18 - Practice justice and you shall have peace: they are friends to each other! (en. Ps. 84, 12)

19 - In the end Christ will come as a judge to demand back the things He has given (adn. Iob 37)

Mercy

1 - Misericordia (mercy) is called like this because it makes the heart (cor) of whoever feels pain for somebody else’s misfortune miserum, that is, afflicted. This name, however, does not affect the person who is merciful, since he or she is free from misery (mor. 1, 27, 53)

2 - Do not cut off the bridge of mercy (en. Ps. 60, 6)

3 - The Lord sees when He has mercy (Io. ev. tr. 49, 20)

4 - The only and true God, creator of heaven and earth, makes it possible that justice does not rule out mercy and mercy does not impede justice (cons. ev. 1, 14, 21)

5 - God in judging is merciful, in being merciful is just (ep. 167, 6, 20)

6 - Mercy is good, but it must be not against judgment (qu. exp. c. pag. 88)

7 - Mercy is gratuitous, judgment is due (praed. sanct. 14, 29)

8 - The task of the divine mercy is to free those who are in misery (en. Ps. 135, 4)

9 - God’s mercy, when it punishes the world, does not want to condemn it. Strict punishment is always according to justice. Strictness (severitas) is, in a way, cruel (saeva) truth (veritas) (s. 171, 5)

10 - Nobody is freed unless by means of an undue mercy, nobody is condemned unless by means of a due judgment (ench. 24, 94)

11 - The Lord says: I have a credit with you and you have a credit with another person; remit his debt and I shall remit your debt (en. Ps. 143, 7)

12 - Whatever evil you don’t commit because of His protection, consider it as a remitted debt (virg. 52, 53)

13 - Christ became man for man. What great mercy! It was not great for Him to be what He was; He wanted something great: to become what He had made (s. 229/H, 1)

14 - Only two remained: the adulteress and Jesus, the miserable woman and mercy (misericordia) (Io. ev. tr. 33, 5)

15 - O God of mercies, help those who understand and kindle the interior light in those who look for truth (c. ep. fund. 27, 29)

V - THE VALUES OF LIFE

Being

1 - God is not someone who somehow is, but who is what He is (conf. 13, 31, 46)

2 - Being has no opposite except non-being. There is therefore no creature opposed to God. God is, in fact, being in the most truthful sense, because by this word the meaning of a nature subsisting in itself and immutable is implied (mor. 2, 1, 1)

3 - Everything exists, inasmuch as it is and in the measure in which it is, comes from one God (duab. an. 6, 9)

4 - ‘I am who I am’ said in a divinely splendid way the Lord God to His servant Moses. He is truly because He is unchangeable. Every change makes that what was be no longer. All other realities, made by Him, have received their being according to their measure (nat. b. 19)

5 - ‘I am who I am’ - ‘I am the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob’ (Exodus 3:15). The first name is for Himself, the second for us; having already a name that expresses eternity, He wanted also a name that might express mercy (s. 7, 7)

6 - To be means to exist always in the same way (Io. ev. tr. 38, 10)

7 - ‘Being’ is a name which indicates immutability. Every reality that changes ceases to be what it was and starts to be what it was not. The being is. Only what is immutable has true, pure and genuine being (s. 7, 7)

8 - Every thing that tends to destruction tends to non-being. God exists in an immutable and incorruptible way, while what is called ‘nothing’ does not exist at all… Why are you looking for a nature contrary to God, to whom, since He is in the highest degree, no nature can be contrary (c. ep. fund. 40, 46)

9 - We exist, we are aware of existing, and we love our existing and our awareness of existing (civ. 11, 26)

10 - If I am mistaken, I exist. Whoever does not exist cannot be mistaken; therefore if I am mistaken, I exist (civ. 11, 26)

11 - Only a dead soul can contradict life. And how does it die? Not by ceasing to be a principle of life, but by losing its life. A soul, in fact, is a principle of life for another substance and, at the same time, has its own life. Consider the established order of creatures. The life of a body is the soul; the life of a soul is God (s. 65, 4, 5)

Truth

Seeking it

1 - May they themselves be what they are looking for, and may they be made contrite by the things they say in their own hearts (en. Ps. 67, 7)

2 - What are you looking for outside what you are if it is in your power to be what you are looking for? (en. Ps. 41, 1)

3 - One thing is to seek God, another thing is to seek man. Let us not rejoice in ourselves, but rather in the One who was the first to seek us (en. Ps. 69, 6)

4 - Seek with humility, by remaining low. Finding truth, you will reach a secure height (s. 216, 8)

5 - Ask, seek, knock! You ask by praying, you seek by knocking, you knock by giving alms. Let not your hands be inactive (s. 389, 2)

6 - Seek truth, not in order to win, but to find it (mor. 2, 3, 5)

7 - It is better to have doubts about mysterious things than to dispute about uncertain ones (Gn. litt. 8, 5, 9)

8 - People of great intelligence, if they persisted in seeking, managed to find truth through the visible aspects of creation. Many times men were more guilty of stifling truth in injustice and immorality than they were unaware of truth itself (spir. et litt. 12, 19)

9 - Where are we seeking unless inside us? And what are we seeking unless us? As if we were not in us and we had gone far from us to some hidden place. Don’t you pay attention to such profundity and are you not frightened by it? And what is this, except our own nature, not as it has been, but as it is now? Unfortunately it is more object of exploration than of understanding. I myself, before such an issue, thought that I would have understood it if I had reflected about it; I reflected, but I couldn’t. Other times I didn’t think I would be able to understand, but I succeeded. It is evident that the strengths of my intelligence are not known to me, and I think also to you (an. et eius or. 4, 7, 10)

10 - I think that you are trying to understand as well, but you cannot; you would not, anyway, try if you didn’t hope to be able to. Therefore you ignore the capabilities of your intelligence too (an. et eius or. 4, 7, 11)

11 - We must first search about the nature of a certain thing, then where it is from (c. ep. fund. 36, 41)

12 - There are two kinds of persecutors, those who insult and those who flatter. The tongue of the flatterer is more harmful than the hand of the murderer: one cuts you into pieces, the other anoints you with its oil. Why do they praise me? Let them rather praise God (en. Ps. 69, 5)

13 - Whoever searches with great ardour and persists constantly and piously will soon find truth. Men can make us remember something with signs of words, but the only interior teacher teaches, the incorruptible truth in person. He is the only interior Teacher, who made Himself exterior in order to call us from the exterior things to the interior ones (c. ep. fund. 36, 41)

14 - Piety seeks by believing, vanity by contradicting (s. 261, 2)

15 - By the interior light of truth the interior man is pleasantly enlightened (mag. 12, 40)

16 - They who seek the Lord shall praise Him, because those who seek the Lord shall find Him and those who find Him shall praise Him. Let me now seek You, Lord, calling upon You; let me call upon You believing in You (conf. 1, 1, 1)

17 - He is looked for to be found with more sweetness, He is found to be looked for with more ardour(trin. 15, 2, 2)

18 - Let us seek together in faith in order to enjoy together in vision (s. 261, 3)

19 - Neither do I speak any true thing to men which You have not first heard from me, nor do You hear any such thing from me which You have not first said to me (conf. 10, 2, 2)

20 - Let our purpose rest here for a little while, not that we may think to have found already what we seek, but only where to look for it (trin. 8, 10, 14)

21 - Flatterers praise me for things for which I would not like to be praised, while they find fault with what is dear to me. Flatterers: liars and deceivers (en. Ps. 140, 17)

Possessing it

1 - Truth makes innocent, vanity defiles; truth speaks, vanity makes noise (s. 8, 5)

2 - If you want to be a temple of truth, you must destroy the idol of falsity (s. 53, 7, 7)

3 - Falsity wanted to be near truth (s. 315, 1, 2) - Iniquity and falsity coincide (en. Ps. 57, 5)

4 - Great is the strength of truth. Men hate truth, but unknowingly prophesy truth: they themselves don’t operate, but truth operates in them (s. 315, 1, 2)

5 - In order to meet truth it is necessary to reach the immutable reality (vera rel. 3, 3)

6 - The immutable truth is the law of all arts and art of the almighty artist (vera rel. 31, 57)

7 - Truth is the chastity, not of the body, but of the soul (c. mend. 19, 38)

8 - Falsity is believing that what is not is; truth shows what really is (vera rel. 36, 66)

9 - A soul must be enlightened by God in order to enjoy truth (conf. 4, 15, 25)

10 - Nobody can rightly approve good and disapprove evil unless through the truth he has in his heart (s. 12, 4)

11 - Many things are allowed because of the indulgence to human fragility, although they are not at all accepted by the absolute transparency of truth (c. mend. 19, 39)

12 - Truth is indestructible because immutable, and all the blows directed against it fall back, and with greater strength, on those who dare hit it, who should instead believe, in order to be worthy to understand it  (Gn. c. man. 1, 4, 8)

13 - Truth in time is bread, in eternity will be a drink, since there will be no longer need to break, so to say, and chew the bread of discussion and of dialogue, but only to drink the genuine and evident truth (s. dom. m. 2, 10, 37)

14 - It is amazing that a soul sees in itself the idea of a righteous soul, even if it is not such. Is there in the soul another soul? What the soul sees is, in fact, the interior truth, present to the soul, which is able to grasp it. And how will a soul be able to become righteous, unless by clinging to the ideal it intuits and by conforming to it? (trin. 8, 6, 9)

15 - The most serious and disgusting illness of intelligence consists in defending one’s irrational impressions as a rational criterion of truth, even after a really rational criterion has been offered (civ. 2, 1)

16 - May men learn how to die for the sake of truth (s. 300, 6)

Good

Good

1 - Everything that exists, inasmuch as it exists, is good (vera rel. 11, 21)

2 - Every good is either God or comes from God (vera rel. 18, 35)

3 - Every being is good inasmuch as it has been pleasing to God (Gn. litt. 1, 5, 11)

4 - Beings are considered better or worse according to the different degrees of their natures. On the base of utility they are evaluated in a different way. Thus the point of view of someone contemplating nature is very different from the judgments of those moved by the necessities of life or by their desires (civ. 11, 16)

5 - We say that a man is ‘good’, or that anything else is ‘good’. But there is a Good that is simply such, the Good itself in which and by which all things are good. This is the delight of the Lord, and we shall contemplate it (en. Ps. 26, II, 8)

6 - No wonder if good people are good in order to reach happiness; what is amazing is that evil people too are evil in order to be happy (en. Ps. 118, s. 1, 1)

7 - The strength of good is such that also evil people love it (s. 29, 1)

8 - The supreme good of man is something which, once attained, makes him completely happy. But this reality is only God. We cannot be united with Him except through affection, love, charity (mor. 1, 14, 24)

9 - No changeable good would exist if an unchangeable Good did not exist (trin. 8, 3, 5)

10 - The supreme good of man can neither be inferior to man himself nor similar to him. If this good exists, it must be of such nature that might not be possible to lose it against one’s will (mor. 1, 3, 5)

11 - It is good that there are not only good realities, but also bad ones (ench. 24, 96)

12 - From good things bad ones came: not bad works from good wills, but bad wills from good natures (c. Iul. 1, 8, 38)

13 - There would not have been any bad reality which people can use well if nobody had sinned (c. Iul. 4, 1, 4)

Evil

1 - God’s gift of existence and life does not harm anyone, and yet the evil of concupiscence cannot be except in one who exists and lives. This is the reason why there can be something bad in a gift of God, which must be healed by another gift of God: regeneration (c. Iul. 4, 1, 5)

2 - As it is evil to make bad use of goods, it is good to make good use of evils (retr. 2, 22, 2)

3 - Righteous people serve God willingly, unrighteous ones under compulsion: nobody can escape the laws of the almighty (agon. 7, 7)

4 - Evil must be fled with the most prudent attention; good must be striven for with the most burning charity (s. dom. m. 2, 9, 35)

5 - When there is a battle, there is always some evil. Good may fight against evil or evil against evil. If two goods fight against each other, the battle itself is a great evil (c. Iul. 5, 7, 28)

6 - The first vice of the rational soul consists in wanting to do what the supreme and intimate truth forbids (vera rel. 20, 38)

7 - The degradation of the soul resides in what it has done, and the limitation it gets as a consequence is the punishment it receives. In this all evil consists (vera rel. 20, 39)

8 - The degradation of the soul is nothing else than sin and the punishment of sin (vera rel. 23, 44)

9 - The degradation of the soul consists in the love for any other object that is not the soul or God (util. cred. 16, 34)

10 - No painter would dare to paint and no poet would dare to sing two realities of which one is very good and the other very bad, as if they were able to stay together: innocence and impudence (c. Iul. 5, 2, 6)

11 - God, the creator of all things, made them very good. In His foreknowledge He knew that it was more convenient to His absolutely omnipotent goodness to draw good also from evil than not to allow the existence of evil. He therefore regulated the life of angels and men in such a way that He first might show the power of their freedom and then the power of the benefit of His grace and the judgment of His justice (corrept. 10, 27)

12 - Evil persons can use good things to do evil, God can use evil things for good (s. 15, 3)

13 - Only who is always good can make good the one who is evil (s. 61, 2, 2)

14 - God can make good use of the evil people by using them in order to admonish or test the good people (qu. exp.c. pag. 32)

15 - God can make use also of the hearts of evil people for the praise and help of good people (gr. et lib. arb. 20, 41)

16 - God loves good people for all eternity, tolerates the evil ones for a certain period of time (c. don. 20, 31)

17 - God loves also the unrighteous inasmuch as they are men, hates them inasmuch as they are unrighteous. The reason for this is that God loves both His own work and His own justice (c.  Iul. imp. 4, 124)

18 - God does not need any good: He Himself is the supreme good from which every good derives (en. Ps. 70, s. 2, 6)

19 - Who will ever try to do good, if he thinks that evil does not come from the changeable will of creatures, but from the unchangeable divine will? (c. Sec. 2)

20 - One thing is a man who does not do good, another is a man who is not without sin even when he does much good. One thing is to withdraw from every sin, another to have withdrawn from every sin, which only belongs to our future perfection (perf. iust. 13, 31)

21 - We must rather learn how to tolerate the mixture of the evil people for the good people’s sake than to violate the charity of the good ones because of the evil ones (c. litt. Pet. 3, 3, 4)

22 - Evil people do not pollute good people who are in their same environment, since the good people are not in communion with them, but with God’s altar and sacraments (c. don. 5, 8)

23 - Beloved, do not unite yourselves with those who live wickedly. Seek the good people, stay with the good people, be yourselves good people (s. 223, 1)

24 - Find the good people in order to be able to imitate them. Be good yourselves and you will find them. Don’t think all people are evil (s. 260/D, 2)

25 - I don’t care what you have been until now; be what until now you have not been (en. Ps. 149, 9) - Be what you are not yet and stop being what you are (c. Fel. 2, 12)

26 - I already love You alone, You alone I follow, You alone I seek, You alone am I ready to serve: for You alone dominate rightly; under Your rule I wish to be. Command, I pray, and order what You will; teach me how to come to You! If You desert a man, he perishes, but You do not desert him, because You are the supreme good, which, if is sought properly, is always found. This I do ask Your most excellent mercy, that You convert me completely to You (sol. 1, 1, 5-6)

Original sin

1 - Adam’s voice is the voice of the entire humankind (s. suppl. 21, 2)

2 - Adam was not the first one to sin. If you are looking for the first sinner, see the devil. The first angel, rebel to God, was the seducer; the first man was the imitator (s. 294, 15, 15)

3 - As soon as Adam and Eve transgressed the divine precept by eating the fruit of the tree of good and evil, they found themselves interiorly naked, forsaken by God’s grace that they had impudently offended with arrogance and proud love for their own independence. By looking their own bodies they experienced an impulse of concupiscence they did not know before (Gn. litt. 11, 31, 41)

4 - They sinned, they realized, they blushed, they covered themselves (c. Iul. 5, 2, 6)

5 - God asked the first man: ‘Adam, where are you?’ In such a way God made him realize that he was in a condition of separation from God (civ. 13, 15)

6 - Adam, after his sin, has the ugliness of confusion, but not the humility of confession (Gn. litt. 11, 35, 47)

7 - Adam, by hiding his body, was stupidly trying to escape the look of the One who looks in the inmost part of the soul: conscience (c. Iul. 4, 16, 82)

8 - Adam’s sin was extremely serious insofar as it was easy for man not to sin, since man’s nature had not yet been corrupted and the law of sin was not yet rebelling in his own members against the law of the mind. Every man is born with that punishment and destined to perish forever, unless he is reborn, and every man is lost, unless he is found by the one who came to seek whatever had been lost (c. Iul. imp. 2, 189)

9 - Adam’s apostasy was such a great sin that the entire human nature collapsed (c. Iul. imp. 3, 57)

10 - All men have sinned in the first man since all were in him when he sinned; and, by being born by him, all men contracted the sin that is not eliminated except by the rebirth of baptism (c. ep. pel. 4, 4, 7)

11 - All men who are born assume Adam, all men who are reborn assume Christ (c. Iul. imp. 2, 191)

12 - Adam is the upside-down prefiguration of the future Christ (c. Iul. imp. 3, 107)

Concupiscence

1 - Concupiscence is the illness of desire (nupt. et conc. 1, 8, 9)

2 - Cupidity is an impulse of the soul that makes a person take enjoyment from oneself (doctr. chr. 3, 10, 16)

3 - Cupidity ignores where the necessities of life end (c. Iul. 4, 14, 70)

4 - Cupidity wants to divide, charity wants to unite (s. 265, 9, 11)

5 - By ‘concupiscence of the flesh’ the lovers of the lowest kinds of pleasure are indicated; by ‘concupiscence of the eyes’ the curious people; by ‘worldly ambition’ the proud (vera rel. 38, 70)

6 - Concupiscence is a kind of rebel fervour that shakes a mortal body, while trying to draw to itself the entire soul after conquering it; concupiscence is not aroused or appeased according to the mind’s will (pecc. mer. 1, 29, 57)

7 - There are two evils: we possess one of them and we commit the other if we don’t resist the one we possess (c. Iul. 4, 14, 73)

8 - Concupiscence is worse than ignorance inasmuch as ignorance without concupiscence sins less, while concupiscence without ignorance sins more seriously. To ignore evil is not always sin, but to desire evil is always sin. Sometimes the good itself can be ignored with some utility, so that it might be known in a convenient way. Concupiscence is bad because it is indifferently attracted by what is licit and illicit, unless illicit pleasure is curbed by licit pleasure (c. Iul. 6, 16, 50)

9 - Do not have too much eagerness to live and you will not experience eternal death. You cannot see that greediness, insofar as we want more than we need, makes us sin? (s. 107, 9, 10)

10 - If you really want to possess your goods, possess them without greediness, otherwise not you will possess them, but they will possess you (s. 107/A, 4)

11 - You became enslaved by letting yourself be seduced (trin. 13, 18, 23)

12 - In baptism the concupiscence of the flesh is remitted, not in such a way that it is no longer, but in a way that is no longer imputed as sin. It remains as an affection of bad quality, a kind of languor (nupt. et conc. 1, 25, 28)

13 - There is a spiritual concupiscence, which is praiseworthy and by which we aspire to wisdom. But also a shameful concupiscence exists, coming from the sin of disobedience (nupt. et conc. 2, 30, 52)

14 - Free will is enough in order to do evil, but not enough in order to do good, unless it is helped by the almighty Good. This was the first grace given to Adam. The second grace, on the contrary, is the fruit of the work of the second Adam: Christ makes man will, and will intensely, and love with such ardour that he might defeat, with the willingness of the spirit, the willingness of the flesh, which has contrary desires. This grace makes him able to do good and persevere in good (corrept. 11, 31)

Love

1 - To love is nothing else than to desire a thing because of the thing itself (div. qu. 35, 1)

2 - Love is an impulse, a tension (div. qu. 35, 1-2)

3 - Every love is a fire, but it is important to see what the object of a love is (s. suppl. 26, 8)

4 - Love arouses, fear depresses (en. Ps. 79, 13)

5 - Ardour runs over hope, but does not possess the thing hoped for yet (s. 21, 1)

6 - Wherever love is greater, fatigue is lesser (s. 340, 2)

7 - Hardships are not heavy to those who love; they give, on the contrary, satisfaction. What matters is the object of love: if it is loved, also hardship is loved (b. vid. 21, 26)

8 - Nothing is so hard and rigid that is not broken by the fire of love. When, by its merits, the soul will be seized up to God, it will fly, free and admirable, with very beautiful and pure wings, on which chaste love sustains itself in order to reach and love God (mor. 1, 22, 41)

9 - There is no more effective invitation to love than to love first (cat. rud. 4, 7)

10 - Nobody wants to be what he does not love (trin. 8, 6, 9)

11 - Love and you’ll be safe (s. 308/A, 6)

12 - Loving means being benevolent (s. 399, 5, 5)

13 - The love for the many goods is defeated only by the love for the only good (s. 65/A, 2)

14 - Nobody can perfectly love what we are called to reach, without hating what we are asked to avoid (vera rel. 46, 88)

15 - To love the good means to hate selfishness (s. 336, 5)

16 - Love whatever helps your progress toward God and do not love whatever impedes it (s. 311, 4, 4)

17 - Only good loves produce good morals (s. 311, 11, 11)

18 - Love each other in such a way that each one may be able to offer one’s life for the others (s. 332, 2)

19 - The love for the world is hateful (Io. ev. tr. 87, 4)

20 - In love there is breadth, in hatred narrowness (en. Ps. 133, 1)

21 - Our love itself is death to the world and life with God. What is more powerful than this love that overcomes the world? (Io. ev. tr. 65, 1)

22 - Only love is a debt that must be paid always (s. 259, 6)

23 - Without love all the rest is useless, while love is not conceivable without the other good qualities, thanks to which man becomes good (Io. ev. tr. 87, 1)

24 - O Christian, love your enemies, lest inconsiderately you hate your friends too! (s. 306, 9, 8)

Friendship

1 - A friend is the half of one’s soul or a second self, with whom I willingly talk about the things I say to myself: not behaving immoderately during daytime, tolerating the nights patiently (ep. 38, 1; conf. 4, 6, 11)

2 - In all human realities nothing is dear to man without a friend (ep. 130, 2, 4)

3 - Nobody can really be a friend of a man if he is not, in the first place, a friend of truth itself; this love is not at all possible unless it is unselfish (Amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas) (ep. 155, 1, 1)

4 - False friends display grief because of someone else’s misfortunes if it is matter of spiritual afflictions, but, in fact, they laugh at those afflicted; which would not be the case if physical sufferings were at stake (adn. Iob 19)

5 - Christian friendship applies the Biblical principle of Proverbs (27:6): The wounds from a friend are more faithful than the spontaneous kisses of an enemy (ep. 82, 4, 31)

6 - You will be God’s friend if you hate what God hates and you love what God loves (en. Ps. 44, 18)

Beauty

1 - What is the beautiful? And what is beauty? What is it that allures and unites us to the things we love? Grace and beauty, since unless there were grace and beauty in them, they could by no means attract us to them. In bodies themselves there is a beauty coming from the fact that they form a kind of whole, and another coming from fitting conveniently, as one part of the body, with its whole (conf. 4, 13, 20)

2 - The soul is the beauty of the body, God is the beauty of the soul (Io. ev. tr. 32, 3)

3 - God is beautiful in heaven and on earth. Supreme and true beauty is justice; if everywhere He is just, everywhere He is beautiful. May He come to us to be contemplated with the eyes of the spirit (en. Ps. 44, 3)

4 - O supreme Beauty, creator of all things, good God, God supreme good and my true good! (conf. 2, 6, 12)

5 - The beauty of creatures is their hymn of praise (s. 241, 2)

6 - Also a people has its own beauty (vera rel. 26, 48)

7 - Are things beautiful because they are pleasing or are they pleasing because they are beautiful? They are beautiful because they produce a harmonious whole (vera rel. 32, 59)

8 - The regress and progress of creation, with the succession of temporal things, contribute to the beauty of the universe (Gn. litt. 1, 17, 34)

9 - We love the beauty of the house of the Lord when we ourselves are the house of the Lord. And we are such if our hearts are cemented by the bond of love toward all men (s. 15, 1)

10 - To things falling away and succeeding each other a certain temporal beauty of its kind belongs, so that neither those things that die, or cease to be what they were, disfigure or disturb the fashion, appearance and order of the whole of creation; as a speech well composed is certainly beautiful, although syllables and all sounds in it rush past as it were in being born and in dying (nat. b. 8)

11 - Let us not cling to this beauty as lovers, but as praisers of God let us rise above it. And let us hasten on to that good which neither lingers in space nor advances in time, from which all natures in space and time receive their beauty and form... Let us purify the sight and the discernment by which we see, as far as it is allowed in this life, what is just, what is pious, what the beauty of wisdom is (c. ep. fund. 42, 48)

12 - Unity is the form of every beauty (ep. 18, 2)

13 - There is a certain beauty in justice. The punishment may frighten you, but justice has its beauty, asks to be contemplated, inflames its lovers. For it martyrs, despising the world, shed their blood (en. Ps. 32, II, s. 1, 6)

14 - When the hearts of the faithful are cemented by the bond of charity, we have the beauty of the house of God and the place where His glory dwells. Whoever loves the beauty of the house of God undoubtedly loves the Church as well, not understood as walls and roofs and splendid marbles or gilded ceilings, but as the holy faithful who love God with all their heart, with all their soul, with all their mind, and their neighbour as themselves (s. 15, 1)

15 - O my God, attracted by Your beauty, I was immediately distracted from You by my weight, falling down with grief to this earthly reality. This weight consisted in my carnal habits (conf. 7, 17, 23)

16 - To us who believe may the Bridegroom present Himself beautiful. Beautiful as God, Word with God; beautiful in the womb of the Virgin, beautiful the Word born as a boy, brought in the arms, food for the meek. Beautiful in heaven and on earth, beautiful in the miracles and in the sufferings; beautiful in giving life and in resuming it; beautiful on the cross, in the tomb, in heaven... Supreme and true beauty is justice; if everywhere He is just, everywhere He is beautiful. May He come to us to be contemplated with the eyes of the spirit (en. Ps. 44, 3)

17 - Too late did I love You, O beauty so ancient and yet so new! Too late did I love You! You were within and I was without, and there I was seeking You; and in my ugliness I was rushing heedlessly among the beautiful things You made. You were with me, but I was not with You. Those things were keeping me far from You, which, unless they were in You, were not (conf. 10, 27, 38)

Unity

1 - Everything exists is one (vera rel. 36, 66)

2 - The unity of God is so much one that it does not have any parts (mor. 2, 11, 24)

3 - There is no salvation unless in union with God (Io. ep. tr. 1, 5)

4 - God is present in the heart, in which unity is preserved (bapt. 1, 2, 3)

5 - God’s unity is the principle from which the unity of everything that is one derives (vera rel. 36, 66)

6 - Every form is forced to conform to the norm of unity (Gn. c. man. 1, 12, 18)

7 - What is the reason why humankind originated from one individual except that unity is recommended to humankind itself? The Lord Christ was born from one creature as well; the Virgin is a sign of unity because she keeps her virginity and preserves incorruptibility (s. 268, 3)

8 - Such is the strength and power of integrity and unity that also many things, which are good, are pleasing only when they come together to form something unitary (Gn. c. man. 1, 21, 32)

9 - Pride broke the harmony of human tongues and, out of one, many were born; charity, out of many languages, makes just one (Io. ev. tr. 6, 10)

10 - The charity of the good people tolerates everything in unity for unity’s sake (c. ep. Parm. 2, 6, 11)

11 - We are one thing because we are in the One (s. 55, 2, 2)

12 - I am, I am one, all people with me in unity are only one thing (s. 138, 5, 5)

13 - What happened on Pentecost? The single persons, on whom the Holy Spirit rested, spoke in the tongues of each nation - some of them in one tongue, others in another tongue, distributing among themselves the languages of all peoples? No, it did not happen this way, but every single person was speaking the languages of all peoples… With this event the unity of the catholic Church, spread all over the world, is recommended (s. 268, 1)

14 - If you want to live of the Holy Spirit, keep charity, love truth, desire unity, and you will reach eternity (s. 267, 4)

15 - Nothing is sweeter than the affection that unites brothers and sisters, but nothing is more dangerous than discord among peoples (s. suppl. 27, 1)

16 - Reflect about unity, brethren, and see if in the multiplicity itself of realities other things can give delight except unity: who could ever tolerate you if you didn’t possess the unity of the same feelings? (s. 103, 3, 4)

17 - The fatigue of multiplicity passes, the charity of unity remains (s. 104, 3)

18 - The catholic unity welcomes in her motherly bosom all people who endeavour to keep the unity of the spirit in the bond of peace, while waiting that the Lord may reveal their mistake to one of the two parties (bapt. 2, 6, 8)

19 - We should not despair of any man, whether he is one who shows himself to be a sinner within the Church or whether he more openly opposes it from outside. As far as the spiritual are concerned, or those who are advancing with pious zeal toward this end, they do not stray outside; for even when, by some perversity or necessity among men, they seem to be driven out, they can prove who they are better than if they had remained within, since they are in no degree roused to contend against the Church, but remain rooted, in the strongest foundation of charity, on the solid rock of unity (bapt. 1, 17, 26)

20 - Build yourselves into unity, in order not to fall into separation (s. 217, 4)

21 - We must cling to the One, enjoy the One, continue being one (trin. 4, 7, 11)

Peace

1 - Who are the enemies of peace? Those who break unity. They separated themselves from the others in order to be a community of only righteous people and not to be mixed with the unrighteous. But we say: love peace, love Christ. Whoever loves peace loves Christ (en. Ps. 119, 9)

2 - I beseech you, brothers and sisters, live meekly, live peacefully, while allowing authorities to act according to their own duties, about which they will have to be accountable to God and to their superiors. Address them respectfully and calmly; keep far from the environments of evil and crime; as much as you can, operate in your families, with your neighbours and friends, in order to admonish, convince, teach, reprehend, so that God may accelerate the time of His mercy and put an end to human misfortunes (s. 302, 21)

3 - Great sacrament is the kiss of peace: may it be really a sign of love! Do not repay evil with evil in your heart; if someone hates you, you can love him and kiss him without fear (s. 229, 3)

4 - The Lord will give peace in immortality to those who have peace in charity (s. suppl. 16, 8) - Perfect peace means not wanting vengeance at all (s. dom. m. 1, 19, 56)

5 - Peace should be the object of our desire, while war should be waged only as a necessity, and waged only so that God may, by it, deliver men from the necessity and preserve them in peace. For peace is not sought in order that war may be kindled, but war is waged in order that peace may be obtained (ep. 189, 6)

6 - It is a greater glory to kill war itself by means of words than to kill men by means of swords; and to procure or maintain peace through peace rather than through war (ep. 229, 2)

7 - There is a war when there is an enmity somehow furnished with weapons (qu. hept. 6, 26)

8 - Peace unifies what was separate; it does not divide into two what was one (s. 47, 22)

9 - Peace is the medicine that heals jealousy (Gal. exp. 52)

10 - In keeping peace with God and with men all vices are healed, with humility and meekness (Gal. exp. 45)

11 - Ordered peace or pacified order? (c. ep. fund. 31, 34)

12 - The peace of the body consists in the duly ordered arrangement of its parts. The peace of the irrational soul is the harmonious repose of the appetites, and that of the rational soul the harmony of knowledge and action. The peace of body and soul is the well-ordered and harmonious life and health of the living creature. Peace between mortal man and God is the well-ordered obedience of faith to the eternal law. Peace between man and man is well-ordered concord. Civil peace is the well-ordered concord between those who rule and those who obey. The peace of the celestial city is the perfectly ordered and harmonious enjoyment of God, and of one another in God. The peace of all things is the tranquillity of order. Order is the distribution which allots things equal and unequal, each to its own place (civ. 19, 13, 1)

13 - The first war must be fought against the world, against Satan and his angels. Another war must be fought with oneself: since it is an interior war, this is the more difficult (en. Ps. 143, 5)

14 - Peace has no end in time, but is the end of every intention and action (Io. ev. tr. 104, 1)

15 - ‘Peace be with you’. Peace is the greeting (salutatio) of salvation (salutis). Is there anything better that Salvation greeting man? Our salvation is indeed Christ! (s. 116, 1, 1)

16 - Lord our God, make us able to invite, because of this largeness of Your love, our brothers and sisters to the possession of peace (s. 358, 4)

Eternity

Time

1 - Time is a footprint of eternity (Gn. litt. imp. 13, 38)

2 - No man can perceive the succession of the ages in its totality (vera rel. 22, 43)

3 - We are involved in ages because of the punishment (of original sin). Ages follow each other because of our suffering (vera rel. 22, 43) - Drops or particles of time (ep. 110, 5; nupt. et conc. 1, 35, 40)

4 - God is before the times, since He is the maker of times (Gn. c. man. 1, 2, 4)

5 - Times are bad, hard and sad, brothers and sisters, and those whom the hardship of the present time cannot correct are harder than them. There is so much display of magnificence, there is so much desire of superfluous things, greediness has no limits. Whoever lives badly will never enjoy better times (s. 346/A, 7)

6 - God would never have created any, I do not say angel, but even man, whose future wickedness He foreknew, unless He had equally known to what uses in behalf of the good He could turn him, thus embellishing the course of the ages, as it were an exquisite poem set off with antitheses... Good is set against evil, life against death, a sinner against a godly man. Consider all the works of the Almighty, all their pairs of opposites (civ. 11, 18)

7 - Why do you want to know the times? All our work consists in transcending the times (s. 265, 4, 5)

8 - From temporal realities we ascend to the eternal ones (vera rel. 25, 47)

9 - One thing is to rest in the Lord while being still in time, another is to transcend all times and settle quietly without end with the maker of times (s. 260/C, 4)

10 - Live well and with your good life change the times; you will not need to complain any longer (s. 311, 8, 8)

11 - May the time of patience pass, may the time of judgment come (en. Ps. 85, 21)

12 - The day of judgment will be here quickly; anticipate its quick coming, be even quicker in converting! (en. Ps. 44, 10)

Eternity

1 - Eternity simply is (div. qu. 19)

2 - Whatever is nothing, whatever has no reality, whatever is not cannot be eternal (c. Iul. imp. 5, 36)

3 - Neither the nothing is anything, nor is it able to do anything, otherwise it would not be nothing (c. Iul. imp. 5, 44)

4 - Failure is not to be already nothing, but to tend toward nothingness. For when those things which are superior descend toward those things which are inferior, they fail their own nature. When the soul descends toward the body, somehow becomes body-like (c. Sec. 11)

5 - It is clear that God did not produce all things as parts of Himself, but He made them through His word and command. Not as parts of Himself, but out of nothing. He did not have anything from which to get them (nat. b. 26)

6 - Eternity only is: not ‘it was’, as if it were no longer; not ‘it will be’, as if it were not yet (vera rel. 49, 97)

7 - Where eternity is there is no age (c. Max. 2, 14, 6)

8 - It is called ‘Is’, and not only is called, but is so, is unchangeable: It ever remains, It cannot be changed, It is in no part corruptible: It has neither proficiency, for It is perfect; nor has deficiency, since It is eternal (Io. ep. tr. 4, 5)

9 - There is true eternity where is true immortality, that supreme immutability that only God has, for God cannot be changed at all. One thing is, in fact, not to be changed, even if change is possible, another is not to be able to be changed at all (nat. b. 39)

10 - Eternity must be loved (en. Ps. 101, 2, 12) - Don’t look for quality in eternity, but for happiness (s. 261, 2)

11 - Consider what is ephemeral as nothing (s. 349, 5) - The less things are, the more they die (vera rel. 11, 22)

12 - The signs of the times are everything refers to the first coming and passion of Christ, to whom the red evening sky is similar, and equally to the afflictions that will precede His future coming, to which the morning sky, of a sad reddish colour, is similar (qu. ev. 1, 20)

13 - The true and sure seat of the soul is eternity (doctr. chr. 1, 38, 42)

14 - Everyone who in every activity does not look back to the beginning, does not look forward to the end. It is therefore necessary that prospective intention be connected with retrospective memory. For the one who has forgotten what the thing he has begun was will not find how to finish it (civ. 7, 7)

15 - One thing is to rest in the Lord while being still in time, another is to transcend all times and settle quietly without end with the maker of times (s. 260/C, 4)

16 - The health of all the blessed is eternity itself: eternal is health, eternal is concord (s. 305/A, 8)

17 - Our life shall be eternity, where nobody grows or grows old, and where no new day rises, because no old day ends (s. suppl.15, 4)

18 - Let us hate our temporal bonds if we burn with love for eternity (vera rel. 46, 89)

19 - Since we were not fit to take hold of eternal things, and since the foulness of sins was weighing us down, which we had contracted by the love of temporal things, and which were implanted in us as it were naturally, from the root of mortality, it was necessary that we should be cleansed. But we could only be cleansed through temporal things, to which we were already clinging and which are useful, if properly used, for us to be healed and rise to eternal things...  The rational soul, for its part, in order to purify itself, must have faith in temporal things, so that, once purified, it may contemplate the eternal realities: ‘For truth stands to faith in the same relation in which eternity stands to that which has a beginning’ (Plato, Timaeus 29c) (trin. 4, 18, 24)

20 - Everything undergoes any degree of change is not properly called eternal. Insofar as we are changeable, therefore, we stand apart from eternity. When our faith, by vision, shall be truth, then eternity shall possess our now changed mortality… We could not pass to eternal things from our condition, unless we were transferred, by means of the union of the eternal to ourselves through a birth similar to ours, to His own eternity (trin. 4, 18, 24)

21 - Without the Lord our God we are really nothing. Before coming to existence we were nothing, and if we want to be like the men who are without Him, we are nothing else than sinners. If we don’t keep in His presence every resource we have, we lose them (en. Ps. 58, s. 2, 1)

Infinity

1 - Great, really great this ‘Is’ (en. Ps. 101, s. 2, 10)

2 - After being admonished to search for incorporeal truth, I saw Your invisible realities, understood by those things that are made; and, though passing through rejections and struggles, I perceived what it was, which through the darkness of my mind I was not allowed to contemplate; and I was assured that You were, and were infinite, and yet not diffused in space finite or infinite; and that You truly are, who are the same ever, varying neither in part nor motion; and that all other things are from You, on this most sure ground alone, that they are (conf. 7, 20, 26)

3 - God’s knowledge is manifold in its unity and various in its uniformity; it comprehends all the incomprehensible realities with an incomprehensible comprehension (civ. 12, 18)

4 - It is possible for God both to create new things never before created and to preserve His will unaltered by means of His ineffable foreknowledge (civ. 12, 20, 4)

5 - The end is the reality to which we tend, where we shall remain (s. 16/A, 9)

6 - Some people envisage and aspire to an end that shall end; our end, on the contrary, has no end: to unite ourselves with our Saviour and to remain with Him forever (s. 223/G, 2)

7 - Christ is the end not as one that consumes, but that consummates. One thing is to say that a loaf of bread has been finished because it has been eaten, another is to say that a tunic has been finished because it has been completed and is ready to be worn. The end of your efforts is the One to whom your lives tend (en. Ps. 56, 2)

8 - True virtue receives its righteousness from the righteousness of the end (c. Iul. 4, 3, 21)

Happiness

1 - I (Augustine) was unhappy, and unhappy is every soul fettered by the friendship of perishable things: he is torn to pieces when he loses them, and then becomes aware of the unhappiness which he had also before he lost them. This was happening to me at that time (conf. 4, 6, 11)

2 - O folly, which does not know how to love men as men! O foolish man that I then was, enduring with so much impatience the human condition! So I was fretting, sighing, weeping, tormenting myself, and taking neither rest nor advice. For I was carrying about with me a rent and polluted soul, impatient of being carried by me, and I could not find where to lay it (conf. 4, 7, 12)

3 - I was going farther and farther from You, where You permitted me to go, and I was being tossed here and there, and I was flowing away, and I was scattered in all directions, and I was boiling with my fornications, and You were keeping silent (conf. 2, 2, 2)

4 - And where was I when I was looking for You? You were in front of me, but I had gone away also from myself and I could not find myself; still less I was able to find You (conf. 5, 2, 2)

5 - As all men want to be happy, certainly, if they want it truly, they also want to be immortal. A life, then, cannot be both happy and forsake a man against his will, since no one becomes happy against his will; and hence how much more does it make a man miserable by forsaking him against his will, when it would make him miserable if he had it against his will! For how can a life be happy if the happy man does not love it? Or how can a thing be loved, if it is received indifferently, whether it may flourish or perish? (trin. 13, 8, 11)

6 - Is it enough, O Lord God of truth, to know those things in order to please You? Unhappy is the man who knows all those things, but does not know You, while happy is he who knows You, though he may not know those things. But a man who knows both You and them is not happier on account of them, but is happy on account of You only, if, knowing You, he glorifies You as God and gives thanks, and does not become vain in his thoughts (conf. 5, 4, 7)

7 - How do I seek You, O Lord? When I seek You, my God, I seek a happy life. I will seek You, so that my soul may live. For my body lives by my soul, and my soul lives by You... Is not a happy life the thing all desire, and is there anyone who altogether does not desire it? If all men, with one voice, were asked whether they wished to be happy, without any doubt they would answer ‘yes!’ (conf. 10, 20, 29)

8 - I was slow to turn to the Lord and from day to day I was deferring to live in You, but I was not deferring daily to die in myself. Being in love with a happy life, I was nevertheless fearing it in its own abode and, while fleeing from it, I was seeking it (conf. 6, 11, 20)

9 - Let it be far, O Lord, let it be far from the heart of Your servant who confesses to You; let it be far from me to think that I can be happy by any kind of joy. For there is a joy which is not granted to the wicked, but to those who worship You without seeking any reward, whose joy You Yourself are. And the happy life is this: to rejoice unto You, by You, because of You; this is it, and there is no other. Those who think that there is another follow after another joy, and not the true one (conf. 10, 22, 32)

10 - Even in that wretched restlessness of the spirits who fell away and discovered their own darkness, unclothed of the garments of Your light, You sufficiently show how noble You have made the rational creature; to which nothing that is inferior to You will suffice for a happy rest, and so not even itself (conf. 13, 8, 9)

11 - Give Yourself to me, O my God, return Yourself to me; behold, I love You, and if it is too little, let me love You more strongly. I cannot measure my love, so that I may know how much of it is lacking in me so that my life may run into Your embracements, and not be turned away until it be hidden in the secret place of Your face. This only I know, that all is bad to me except You - not only outside, but also inside me; and all plenty which is not my God is poverty (conf. 13, 8, 9)

12 - O my God, let me serve and worship You, so that I may have well-being from You, because on You my well-being depends (conf. 13, 1, 1)

13 - What is better than this good or happier than this happiness: to live for God and by God, in whom is the source of life and at whose light we shall see light? (spir. et litt. 22, 37)